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Top Master Programme in Nanoscience assessed as excellent

19 December 2012
The Top Master Programme in Nanoscience has been assessed by an international peer review committee, organized by QANU, and their report has now been published.

On all three standards that have to be assessed, the committee has awarded the Top Master Programme the highest possible distinction of "excellence". The overall summary assessment is also "excellent". The meaning of this epithet is, according to the NVAO rules: "The programme systematically well surpasses the generic quality standards across its entire spectrum and is regarded as an (inter)national example".

The committee also writes: "...the committee wants to exemplify this programme as a 'best practice' for other master's programmes in Nanoscience (national and international)."
The Top Master Programme in Nanoscience started in 2003. The tenth cohort of students started in September 2012. Sofar, 50 students have graduated from this Programme, of whom 49 continued towards a PhD.
Last modified:01 February 2017 12.44 a.m.

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