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International Security

How do actors relate to each other and their natural environment in terms of threats and vulnerabilities? When and how is violence organized? How can possible conflicts be prevented or solved?

International Security, a track of the master International Relations, is aimed at issues of power politics and international order, peace and war, and strategy and diplomacy. Its main focus is the phenomenon of, and theoretical reflection on, 'violence' in its broader context.

Traditionally, attention for warfare and political violence, i.e. military security, has dominated the study of International Security. They still form the central issues. But especially after the Cold War other concerns occupy the agenda, such as environmental security (about climate change or industrial hazards), societal security (about group identities) and economic security (about welfare and development). These different types of concerns have their own meaning when studying the causes of violent conflict, its prevention and management, and conflict resolution and reconciliation.

Methodologically, the study of International Security has profited from the so-called constructivist turn in International Relations. In addition to traditional analyses new approaches have emerged, most notably Critical Security Studies, the Copenhagen School, and the Risk Society approach.

How do actors relate to each other and their natural environment in terms of threats and vulnerabilities? When and how is violence organized? How can possible conflicts be prevented or solved?

International Security, a track of the master International Relations, is aimed at issues of power politics and international order, peace and war, and strategy and diplomacy. Its main focus is the phenomenon of, and theoretical reflection on, 'violence' in its broader context.

Traditionally, attention for warfare and political violence, i.e. military security, has dominated the study of International Security. They still form the central issues. But especially after the Cold War other concerns occupy the agenda, such as environmental security (about climate change or industrial hazards), societal security (about group identities) and economic security (about welfare and development). These different types of concerns have their own meaning when studying the causes of violent conflict, its prevention and management, and conflict resolution and reconciliation.

Methodologically, the study of International Security has profited from the so-called constructivist turn in International Relations. In addition to traditional analyses new approaches have emerged, most notably Critical Security Studies, the Copenhagen School, and the Risk Society approach.

More about this programme
  • Testimonial of Sanne Roefs

    – Sanne Roefs
  • Testimonial of Daniel Craanen

    Internship at the Scottish Parliament in the United Kingdom

    As the organizational culture at the Scottish Parliament is very informal overall, I was given a very reasonable deal of responsibility which allowed me to experience the workings of the parliament first-hand. As such, I learned much about the day-to-day workings of a MSP's (Member of Scottish Parliament) office and the politics and alliances within the parliament itself – on a local as well as on an international level.

    Close
    – Daniel Craanen
  • Testimonial of Paul Morgenstern

    The master degree at the University of Groningen is fun and challenging.

    The reason why I applied for the master in International Relations, Security track at the University of Groningen is because it aligned with my interests and it had a system that allowed students who had BA degrees from Universities outside Europe to apply. The master degree at the University of Groningen is fun and challenging. It is made up of research seminars, lectures about IR theory as well as a 20.000 to 25.000-word thesis and an internship at an international institution like the European Union, a Government Ministry or Embassy.

    Challenging, Exciting, and Intense

    If I was to summarize the programme in three words they would be challenging exciting and intense. With good time management I can complete all my work for the week by 4 to 5 hours per day, including weekends, but this depends on the spread of your assignments because some students are given two assignments to complete in one week so naturally they spend more time on their work in that given week.

    Over all this masters at the University of Groningen is the best fit for me and I would highly recommend it to anyone who is passionate about studying International Relations.

    Close
    – Paul Morgenstern
Facts & Figures
Degree
MA in International Relations
Croho code
60734
Course type
Master
Language of instruction
English (100%)
Duration
12 months (60 ECTS)
Start
February, SeptemberFebruary, September
Programme form
full-time
Faculty
Arts

University of Groningen OTS/Talent Grant Faculty of Arts

Are you a non-EU/EEA student from Mexico, Russia, China, Brasil, or Indonesia, starting a Master's programme at the Faculty of Arts? If so, you could qualify for the University of Groningen OTS/Talent Grant, Faculty of Arts, a partial scholarship which helps you to finance your studies.

Read more about the OTS/Talent Grant Faculty of Arts or download  the brochure  here.

Research Master

Are you interested in a research oriented career? Please also check our Research Master's Programme of International Relations