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UG Makers

01 April 2024

Every two weeks, UG Makers puts the spotlight on a researcher who has created something tangible, ranging from homemade measuring equipment for academic research to small or larger products that can change our daily lives. That is how UG researchers contribute to the solutions for big scientific and societal challenges. For decades, engineering teaching and research at the UG has been part of a wide array of strong disciplines, and from a national point of view, our collaboration with the four technical universities is becoming more and more intensive.

This page is updated every two weeks.

Maria Loi
Maria Loi

Night vision with artificial atoms

Through the magnifying glass, we see a thin plate covered with quantum dots:  semiconducting particles with very special properties owing to their tiny size. Professor Maria Loi uses them to ‘see’ in the dark since they can be used to make digital infrared cameras. Read the rest of the article here.

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Erik Heeres

Flying on wood dust

Inside the pyramid is a tube of sustainable aviation fuel made from lignin (wood dust). That’s a residual product from the paper industry that is usually burnt on site. ‘Burning is actually the last thing you want to do in the life cycle of a material,’ explains Professor of Chemical Engineering Erik Heeres. ‘We want to increase the value to that lignin, in this case by turning it into a biofuel.’. Read the rest of the article here.

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The Novolizer inhalator, Cyclops and Twincer

Cyclone helps patients

At least 600,000 patients currently use an inhaler invented by the team around Erik Frijlink, Professor of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmacy at the UG. ‘And that number is headed towards one million. It’s great when you are able to develop a product that can help patients’, Frijlink says. His team works on new ways to administer drugs, bringing together engineering and pharmacy, physics, medicine, and more. Read the rest of the article here.

Qi Chen
Qi Chen

A plant-based sensor

PhD student Qi Chen presents a sensor the size of an SD card that can detect movement without a battery. ‘This sensor uses green energy’, Chen says. ‘It harvests movement and converts it into an electric signal.’ To build this, Chen employed the natural properties of the soft rush plant, a persistent weed that mostly grows in wet areas. Read the rest of the article here.

Last modified:15 April 2024 11.42 a.m.
View this page in: Nederlands

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