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Extra information for Dutch students

English-taught bachelor versus Dutch-taught bachelor

Students who have a Dutch nationality or speak Dutch, it is important to realise that the Faculty of Law in Groningen offers two international oriented bachelor degree programmes: the Dutch-taught Internationaal en Europees Recht track, which is part of the Dutch-taught programme 'Rechtsgeleerdheid' and the English-taught LLB programme International and European Law. When choosing between these two options, it is important to realise that the English-taught programme does not give you access to the bar or judiciary, so will allow you to become a lawyer or judge in the Dutch system.

When looking at these two programmes, it would be wise to keep in mind what kind of job you would like to have upon graduation. This should be decisive for which programme you want to participate. The programmes are far from the same, as Internationaal en Europees Recht-specialization within the general Dutch Law programme is based on national (Dutch) law and gives access to the bar and the judiciary (after also completing a Master's degree programme). The English-taught bachelor is based on conceptual law rather than national law and does therefore not have the opportunity of giving direct access to the bar or judiciary.

All fields or law are dealt with in the LLB International and European Law, but on a conceptual basis, since it is impossible to teach Dutch law in English. This also means that one will be trained to become a diplomat or work for an international (non-)governmental organization, or a company for instance.

Students who would like to keep the option to enter the bar of judiciary open are strongly recommended to participate in the Dutch-taught programme. There are several courses also taught in English in this Dutch-taught track and in these classes, the students of the Dutch-taught track and English-taught programme are mixed. The only difference is the (wider) outlook in career options.

Last modified:05 June 2019 10.47 a.m.
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