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Malvina Nissim appointed Professor of Computational Linguistics and Society

17 March 2020
Prof. Malvina Nissim
Prof. Malvina Nissim

Malvina Nissim has been appointed Professor of Computational Linguistics and Society at the Faculty of Arts of the University of Groningen as of 1 February 2020.

Prof. Malvina Nissim conducts research on Computational Linguistics, with a special focus on the influence of language technology applications on society. In her position as full professor, she will be involved in developing education in this field. Computational linguistics studies the possibilities of automatic natural language processing, which aim on the one hand to understand natural language better, and on the other hand to develop and improve practical applications, and achieve better and more natural human-machine interaction.

Malvina Nissim's research will be conducted at the Center for Language and Cognition Groningen (CLCG), together with the research group Computational Linguistics. In addition, Prof. Nissim is involved in the activities of her own department and she will play an active role in advancing the field, through national cooperation and internationalization.

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Malvina Nissim
CLCG
Last modified:18 March 2020 3.39 p.m.
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