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Young substance use and substance use disorder in Chile

The role of the family
PhD ceremony:M.E. (Mónica) Lobato Concha
When:September 27, 2021
Start:16:15
Supervisors:prof. dr. M. (Mariët) Hagedoorn, prof. dr. R. (Robbert) Sanderman
Where:Academy building RUG
Faculty:Medical Sciences / UMCG
Young substance use and substance use disorder in Chile

As in other countries, Chilean youth-based treatments for justice-involved youths with substance use disorders need to find ways to obtain better results. One possibility is to involve family members in the intervention, thus we investigated family risk and protective factors for Chilean adolescents' substance use and substance use disorders. Firstly, we replicated international findings regarding risk factors, such as the use of cannabis by family and friends, and protective factors, such as parental monitoring and negative parental attitudes towards adolescent cannabis use. Our findings also showed that: 1) family use but not friend use of cannabis appears to be a risk for developing dependence in adolescents who are using this drug; and 2) the perception that parents used drugs in their past may be a risk factor for adolescent cannabis use, but not its problematic use. Subsequently, we explored parental factors and psychological variables of justice-involved adolescents. Our results showed that maternal and paternal negative parenting were associated with lower self-control and more negative affect in adolescents, and paternal monitoring was related to more positive affect. Furthermore, we explored the perceived barriers and needs of parental figures and professionals. Although both parental figures and professionals had negative perceptions about their justice-involved children and parental figures, respectively, both groups were willing to participate in or to conduct interventions targeted at parental figures. These findings highlighted the role of parental figures and their involvement in youth-based drug treatments, and it seems to be a good path to continue exploring.