Skip to ContentSkip to Navigation
Research Groningen Institute of Archaeology GIA centennial: 2020

The GIA centennial, a photohistory

A large volume could be written about 100 years of GIA. We have chosen to show the multifaceted history of this institute using photos. It was no easy task, 100 photos translates to one photo per GIA year. The photo history will therefore not be published chronologically, but will reflect 100 years of archaeological highlights, top finds and developments in technology, research, education and internationalization. New photos are published weekly and are accompanied with a short caption. The photos will also be also posted on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Photo 2: Levelling in Crustumerium, Italy, 2014

An important aspect for every excavation is the precise measurement of the height of a location, track or object. On the photo a measurement is made of a point at the burial mound 'Quilici O' on the pre-Roman excavation Crustumerium in Italy, where the GIA has been excavating since 2006. The vertical measuring rod in the hands of the employee is called a level staff. With the levelling instrument (bottom of photo) you can read the relative height of the point (or object) on which the level staff stands. This measurement is related to a national measuring point. © Tim Kauling.
An important aspect for every excavation is the precise measurement of the height of a location, track or object. On the photo a measurement is made of a point at the burial mound 'Quilici O' on the pre-Roman excavation Crustumerium in Italy, where the GIA has been excavating since 2006. The vertical measuring rod in the hands of the employee is called a level staff. With the levelling instrument (bottom of photo) you can read the relative height of the point (or object) on which the level staff stands. This measurement is related to a national measuring point. © Tim Kauling.

Photo 1. 1917-37 - Appingedam - De Wierhuizen

In 1916 Jan Evert Scholten bought the remainder of the dwelling mound (wierde or terp) Wierhuizen in Appingedam. Jan Evert was one of the co-founders of the Vere(e)niging voor Terpenonderzoek (1916 - Association for Terp Research), an association that is still active and closely linked to the GIA. The excavation was carried out by a young Albert Egges van Giffen. In 1917 he was assisted in the excavation by 20 interned Belgians. During the First World War, soldiers from countries at war were interned in a neutral country (following the Second Peace Conference of The Hague - 1907). In the terp, remains of houses, farms and graves were found. The rows of posts in the photo were interpreted as “wall houses.” Although later they were re-interpreted as the remains of three-aisled buildings, van Giffen's publications laid the foundations for modern terp research. © University of Groningen, Groningen Institute of Archaeology
In 1916 Jan Evert Scholten bought the remainder of the dwelling mound (wierde or terp) Wierhuizen in Appingedam. Jan Evert was one of the co-founders of the Vere(e)niging voor Terpenonderzoek (1916 - Association for Terp Research), an association that is still active and closely linked to the GIA. The excavation was carried out by a young Albert Egges van Giffen. In 1917 he was assisted in the excavation by 20 interned Belgians. During the First World War, soldiers from countries at war were interned in a neutral country (following the Second Peace Conference of The Hague - 1907). In the terp, remains of houses, farms and graves were found. The rows of posts in the photo were interpreted as “wall houses.” Although later they were re-interpreted as the remains of three-aisled buildings, van Giffen's publications laid the foundations for modern terp research. © University of Groningen, Groningen Institute of Archaeology
Last modified:03 March 2020 4.16 p.m.
printView this page in: Nederlands