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How poppy flowers get those vibrant colours that entice insects | Photo Casper van der Kooi
How poppy flowers get those vibrant colours that entice insects | Photo Casper van der Kooi
Nanopores make portable mass spectrometer for peptides a reality
Date:19 February 2019

University of Groningen scientists have developed nanopores that can be used to directly measure the mass of peptides. An article on this discovery was published on 19 February in Nature Communications.

Oproep: steun fonds voor wetenschapsmusea en science centers
Date:19 February 2019

VSC, de sectororganisatie van wetenschapsmusea en science centers waar ook Science LinX bij aangesloten is, vraagt om het instellen van een speciaal fonds of een regeling voor het financieren van goede wetenschapscommunicatie.

How poppy flowers get those vibrant colours that entice insects
Date:08 February 2019

University of Groningen scientists Casper van der Kooi and Doekele Stavenga used microscopy and mathematical models describing how light interacts with petals of poppies, to find out how the vibrant colours are created.

First transport measurements reveal intriguing properties of germanene
Date:07 February 2019

Scientists led by Prof. Justin Ye of the University of Groningen have now managed to produce devices with stable germanene. The material is an insulator, and it becomes a semiconductor after moderate heating and a very good metallic conductor after stronger heating.

Ferroelectric polymers made more versatile
Date:05 February 2019

The ferroelectric polymer PVDF (polyvinylidene fluoride) has interesting properties and could be used to store information or energy. University of Groningen scientists have created block copolymers from PVDF that leave its ferroelectricity intact, but allow them to tune its characteristics.

Theoretical model may help solve molecular mystery
Date:05 February 2019

When it comes to realizing low-power electronic devices, spintronics look promising. However, to generate a suitable spin current, you need a relatively large magnet. An alternative method that uses a special type of molecule has been proposed, but the big question is: does it work? University of Groningen PhD student Xu Yang has constructed a theoretical model which describes how to put this new method to the test.

Science LinX newsletter February 2019
Date:31 January 2019

Science LinX newsletter for February 2019

Green alternative to PET could be even greener
Date:30 January 2019

An alternative to PET can be made from bio-based furan molecules, but to polymerize these furans you need toxic catalysts and high temperatures. Now, polymer chemists from the University of Groningen, led by Prof. Katja Loos, have described an enzyme-based polymerization method.

How gut bacteria affect the treatment of Parkinson’s disease
Date:18 January 2019

In a study published on 18 January in the journal Nature Communications, scientists from the University of Groningen show that gut bacteria can metabolize levodopa into dopamine. As dopamine cannot cross the blood-brain barrier, this makes the medication less effective.

Complex molecules emerge without evolution or design
Date:17 January 2019

A team of scientists led by University of Groningen Professor of Systems Chemistry, Sijbren Otto, have discovered a new class of complex folding molecules that emerge spontaneously from simple building blocks. The results were published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society on 16 January.

Yeast makes ethanol to prevent metabolic overload
Date:08 January 2019

Why do some yeast cells produce ethanol? Scientists have wondered about this apparent waste of resources for decades. Now, University of Groningen scientists think they have a solution: yeast cells produce ethanol as a ‘safety valve’, to prevent overload when their metabolic operation reaches a critical level. The implications of this new theory, which was published in Nature Metabolism on 7 January, could be far-reaching, as it also explains why cancer cells waste energy by producing lactate, known as the Warburg effect.

Super-flat silicon device enables new far-infrared spectrometer
Date:18 December 2018

SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research has designed a device which is able to filter just one wavelength of far-infrared light from a light beam and can be used in astronomical observations. Bachelor’s student Carolien Feenstra first built a prototype and then the real instrument, which was tested in Canada in late November.

Rewriting the past
Date:13 December 2018

Global spikes in carbon concentration which occur sporadically may help us pinpoint historic events to a single year. Unfortunately, the cause of the spikes may also create chaos for our civilization.

Science LinX newsletter December 2018
Date:31 October 2018

Science LinX newsletter for December 2018

How antibiotics help spread resistance
Date:27 November 2018

Microbiologists from the University of Groningen (UG) and the University of Lausanne describe a new mechanism by which Streptococcus pneumoniae can become competent, and why biofilms may be important in this process. Their results were published in Cell Reports on November 27.

Microbes ‘MacGyver’ membrane transport
Date:26 November 2018

Scientists from the University of Groningen, together with colleagues from Germany and Spain, have described a system that combines a pore and a transporter to import potassium ions into cells against an extreme concentration gradient. The results were published in Nature Communications on 26 November.

A closer look at the communication packages of cells
Date:23 November 2018

Wouter Roos, professor of Molecular Biophysics at the RUG, described as first with colleagues from Amsterdam and Utrecht the mechanical properties of these exosomes from red blood cells. The results have been published in de scientific journal Nature Communications on 23 February.

When not seeing is believing
Date:14 November 2018

A year ago, astronomers identified the first interstellar visitor to our solar system, ‘Oumuamua.Despite a whopping 33 hours of observation time, ‘Oumuamua proved too faint for the Spitzer space telescope to see. Nevertheless, this allowed the observation team to draw significant conclusions.

Styrene Steve wins University of Groningen iGEM team a gold medal
Date:13 November 2018

An ambitious plan to create a yeast cell that will turn cellulose into styrene, the building block of polystyrene plastics, has brought success to the University of Groningen team participating in this year’s iGEM competition.

Enthousiasme over moleculen
Date:08 November 2018

Recensie: wetenschapsjournalist Esther Thole heeft het boek ‘Makers van leven’ geschreven, over het bouwen van leven en op de biologie geïnspireerde materialen om uit te leggen hoe dat gaat.

Science LinX newsletter November 2018
Date:31 October 2018

Science LinX newsletter for November 2018

Dark and clear Night of Nights
Date:30 October 2018

The Blaauw Observatory of the University of Groningen welcomed a record number of 420 visitors on October 27, for the annual Night of Nights.

Nanosized ferroelectrics become a reality
Date:18 October 2018

Using ferroelectricity instead of magnetism in computer memory saves energy. If ferroelectric bits were nanosized, this would also save space. University of Groningen (UG) physicists show how this could become a reality in a paper published in Nature Materials on 22 October.

Understanding the building blocks for an electronic brain
Date:18 October 2018

University of Groningen physicists have developed memristors, resistors with a memory, made from niobium-doped strontium titanate, which mimic how neurons work. Their results were published in the Journal of Applied Physics on 21 October.

Building artificial muscles from nano- to macroscale
Date:11 October 2018

Roboticist Raffaella Carloni wants to build artificial muscles that are inspired by nature, made from nanofibers that, once bundled together, form artificial myofibrils and fascicles. Carloni’s idea has become a European research project and has its kick-off meeting on 15 October at the University of Groningen.

Hands-on science and discovery at Zpannend Zernike
Date:09 October 2018

An array of venues opened their doors in the city centre on Saturday 6 October and at Zernike Campus on Sunday 7 October during the 'Zpanned Zernike' science fair.

New method measures single molecules from nanoliter of blood in real time
Date:05 October 2018

University of Groningen scientists, led by Associate Professor of Chemical Biology Giovanni Maglia, have designed a nanopore system that is capable of measuring different metabolites simultaneously in a variety of biological fluids, all in a matter of seconds. The electrical output signal is easily integrated into electronic devices for home diagnostics. The results were published in Nature Communications.

Blackbirds have more white feathers in the city
Date:04 October 2018

In the first systematic study of leucism (the total or partial lack of black and brown pigments in feathers) in blackbirds, biologists from the University of Groningen show that it is more common in urban than in forest populations. They have a number of explanations for this phenomenon, some of which could have consequences for human city dwellers.

Green ink for 3D prints in filmed article
Date:13 September 2018

A collaborative project between the UG, NHL Stenden University of Applied Sciences and two businesses has produced a ‘green’ ink for a special type of 3D printer. An academic article about this was published at the start of the year and the experiment has also now been filmed for the Journal of Visualized Experiments (JoVE).

Feringa’s motors in the news
Date:19 December 2017

Chemical & Engineering News (a publication of the American Chemical Society) recently published two articles on papers by Ben Feringa: one about a muscle that is flexed by molecular motors and the other about a new environmentally friendly process that makes useful building blocks for plastic and pills.

‘Ridiculously busy is the new normal here’
Date:03 October 2017

Secretary Tineke Kalter was the first UG staff member to hear that Ben Feringa had been awarded the Nobel Prize. The effects are still noticeable a year later. ‘We still receive dozens of requests every day.’

In search of the basis of life
Date:20 September 2017

Egbert Boekema has spent almost his entire academic career working on a single problem: elucidating the structure of the proteins responsible for photosynthesis. His official farewell was on 27 September.

New research centre on the origins of life, the universe and everything
Date:12 April 2017

The Origins Centre will tackle questions submitted to the National Science Agenda about the origin of life on Earth and in the Universe. A number of scientists from the University of Groningen have a leading role in this Centre. Part 1 of a series: the background to the Origins Centre.

Images of Nobel-winning motors by Ben Feringa
Date:20 December 2016

University of Groningen / Science LinX present five images for Nobel-winning motors by Ben Feringa

Ben Feringa awarded the 2016 Nobel Prize for Chemistry
Date:05 October 2016

Ben Feringa is awarded the 2016 Nobel Prize for Chemistry

Spinoza prize winner Bart van Wees: Innovative, smaller and better
Date:13 June 2016

Bart van Wees, Professor of Physics of Nanodevices at the Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials of the University of Groningen, is one of the four recipients of this year’s NWO Spinoza Prize, the highest distinction in Dutch academia. His research stems from his curiosity about the behaviour of electrons inside new materials, but he has always had at least half an eye on practical applications.

Watch our graphene trilogy!
Date:07 November 2013

Science LinX presents three graphene videos.

Chemical evolution
Date:27 March 2013

A short film on a research project by Sijbren Otto, who wants to create life in the lab via chemical evolution.

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