Skip to ContentSkip to Navigation
About usFaculty of LawActueelNewsNews Archive

Launch Research Handbook on Global Health Law

28 March 2019
Research Handbook on Global Health Law

At the panel discussion 'Global Health Governance: the power of law' which took place on 26 March in Geneva, the Research Handbook on Global Health Law was launched. This Research Handbook provides a critical conceptualization and definition of the growing field of global health law.

The Research Handbook forms the first comprehensive study on the treatment of health issues in international legal regimes and explores the role of international law in addressing the most prominent global health challenges. It is also the first systematic overview of the role of health as a normative value in international law. In this panel discussion, four academic experts and contributors to the book presented their insights on their respective fields, their mutual interaction and reflect on the future research agenda for this complex and burgeoning field of scholarship.

From left to right: Professor Stefania Negri (University of Salerno), Professor Thérèse Murphy (Queen's University, Belfast), Dr. Suerie Moon (Graudate Institute, Geneva), Professor Gian Luca Burci (Graduate Institute, Geneva), and Professor Brigit Toebes (University of Groningen)
From left to right: Professor Stefania Negri (University of Salerno), Professor Thérèse Murphy (Queen's University, Belfast), Dr. Suerie Moon (Graudate Institute, Geneva), Professor Gian Luca Burci (Graduate Institute, Geneva), and Professor Brigit Toebes (University of Groningen)

About the event 'Global Health Governance: the power of law'

There is growing awareness among international lawyers as well as health scholars and policy-makers about the influence of public health considerations on the design and implementation of multiple international legal regimes, from human rights to investment law and from international technical standards to environmental law. The role of health in international law (and vice versa) has taken center stage in its own right and as a central component of global governance discourse with a growing interest from scholars in various disciplines. At the same time, this field of study and practice is still unsettled and lacking coherence; talk of “global health law” as a distinct field of international law is contradicted by extreme fragmentation and conflicts or overlaps between legal regimes. There is a need for a holistic reflection both on the operation of specific international legal regimes as well as on general principles and concepts underlying the role of health in international law.

This article was published by the Faculty of Law.

Last modified:12 August 2019 08.50 a.m.

More news