Skip to ContentSkip to Navigation
Over onsOnze positieOnderwijsbeleidLanguage and Culture PolicyCurrent projectsSymposium: 7 November 2016 at Kapteynborg

Workshop Descriptions

Morning sessions 10.45 - 12.15

1.  

What is Intercultural Competence? The field

Michaela Carriere, project leader & trainer intercultural competence, Language Centre, University Groningen

Intercultural…, Cross-cultural…, Multicultural…, Competence,  Communication, Diversity,  Inclusion.
Interrelated terms often used interchangeably, but do they refer to the same thing? This brief overview will clarify some of the differences underlying this interrelated terminology, describing the development of the field over seven decades in four disciplines, across three paradigms of thought in both research and practice.

and

Intercultural Competence Acquisition, the research

Marcel van der Poel, lecturer Hanze University of Applied Science Groningen; freelance trainer and intercultural relations consultant

Fostering the conditions for intercultural competence development; research & practices

2.

Alumnus story: From an international student to a Dutch writer

Vinnie Ko, alumnus University Groningen; PhD candidate Statistics and Biostatistics University of Oslo

Vinnie Ko came to Groningen in 2009 as an international student. In the beginning, he sticks to his English. But when he learns Dutch, Groningen suddenly becomes much bigger and he goes through a set of adventures. After his study, he writes columns (in Dutch) about his experience on the website of De Groene Amsterdammer, one of the oldest newsmagazines in the Netherlands. His first book Met hartelijke groente will be published at the end of November 2016.

In his presentation, Vinnie will tell his successes and obstacles of his integration process in a humorous and witty manner.

and

International Student Voices - Panel

Kristina Preiksaityte, educational assistant Language Centre University of Groningen

What is it like to be an international student? Do the benefits of studying abroad outweigh the struggles of cultural adjustment? Being exposed to an unfamiliar surrounding can be both exhilarating and overwhelming. An international studying experience allows you to broaden and sophisticate your worldview, yet differences in communication patterns and social understandings, unknown sights, and a foreign language – all this might appear as equally confusing as it is invigorating. Join our panel discussion and share your thoughts and experiences on how to adjust in new cultures more effectively. Speakers will include students both from The Netherlands and abroad..

3. (Fully Booked)

Language and Culture Policy Best Practices in 20 minutes each

Faculty representatives

Monique Kroese, Faculty of Economics and Business: Incoming Exchange students: optimizing their study abroad period

Mentor guidance: Our aim is to help incoming exchange students integrate more quickly, find their way into the faculty right from the start and thus enable them to study more successfully. In this presentation I will explain the reasons for FEB to develop this initiative, and show you the set-up of the programme and first reactions.

Kevin Haines, Sander van den Bos and Nynke-Boudien Plat University College Groningen: Feedback across cultures

This presentation will consider the need to embed understandings of cultures and the use of language in academic and disciplinary communities. Creating a better understanding of the various dimensions of culture(s) amongst academic staff is empowering because it puts the teachers in a better position to make constructive use of diversity in their teaching, for instance when providing feedback. Providing feedback across both disciplinary and cultural boundaries represents a steep learning curve, but one that should be addressed.
The support staff side of the project focuses on the surrounding environment (informal curriculum), ensuring tailored support in language and intercultural skills for the support staff whose work ensures that the learning environment serves the needs of a diverse group of students and staff. This is achieved through cultural awareness workshops and tailored language development for support staff members based on their specific UFO profile and concrete tasks.

Gerald Jonker, Faculty of Science and Engineering: Tailor-made English language support for undergraduate students

After the introduction of the 10 English-taught undergraduate programmes, specific attention has been given to tracking the effective English language proficiency of students. It appears that a relatively high proportion of the students shows a proficiency well under the expected CEFR C1 (entrance requirement for international students and supposed English level of Dutch high school graduates). The Faculty (in collaboration with the Language Centre) is running a pilot that allows students to work at their proficiency within the curriculum in a tailor-made fashion.

Dinie Bouwman, Faculty of Behavioural and Social Sciences, LCP in the service of the International Classroom

Language and intercultural competences are conditional to good teaching and learning in an International Classroom. How do we go about to reach our goals?

4.

Chinese: A characterless future?

Oliver Moore, professor of Chinese Culture and Language University Groningen

This talk considers how Western expectations of what China is as variously society, culture and economy engage at the level of spoken and written forms of the Chinese language--the main but by no means the only language used by the population of the People's Republic of China. This talk considers some of the ways outsiders form an idea of China through variously expert and naive understandings of language, the history of these attitudes, and, most importantly, the historical and contemporary conditions of alternative attitudes in China.

and

Chinese Language & Song

Jiang Wei, Chinese teacher in Groningen Confucius Institute

Can we learn Chinese language in an interesting and entertaining way?

During this interactive workshop, Jiang Wei will introduce some methods to acquire Chinese language in which the cultural connotations will be considered as well. Participants will have a chance to learn Chinese through songs and try their hands at Chinese calligraphy.

5.

Language MOOCS Frisian & Dutch

Jeroen van Engen, lecturer in Dutch for non-native speakers, Language Centre University Groningen

Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC) are currently quite popular among people from all walks of life. Many universities, including the University of Groningen, have been offering MOOCs on various subjects; two of these MOOCs provided by the University of Groningen are on learning a language: Introduction to Dutch and Introduction to Frisian (launching 26 September). Dutch and Frisian are the two official languages in the Netherlands. This workshop will briefly introduce the concept of the language MOOCs and then move on to working through a few exercises of the Frisian / Dutch MOOC to become acquainted with learning a language through this method.

and

Multivocality in the International Classroom: Making Linguistic and Cultural Difference Audible

Tilman Lanz, University Groningen

It is widely regarded desirable to have cultural and linguistic diversity at your workplace today. Creating such culturally and linguistically diverse workplaces, however, constitutes a substantial – and sometimes difficult – task. This presentation focuses on four aspects of relevance in this context: ethnocentrism, linguistic and cultural competence, essentialism, evaluating diverse students. In all four cases, I define the problematic aspect and then show how it can be addressed. In conclusion, the presentation provides examples for the rich experience an international classroom can be, once it has come to life with the sound of different voices.

6.

Intercultural management

Marjoleine Havik, intercultural trainer & coach at CulturesConnect

When managing a team in an international environment it is useful to have an understanding of how the members of your team deal with intercultural differences. There are more than 500 models (some with accompanying instruments) of intercultural competence - ranging from cultural intelligence, global competences inventory, intercultural sensitivity, intercultural readiness… and many others. Only a limited number of instruments have been found to be sufficiently valid and reliable. In my own experience I have chosen to work with the Bennett model, the DMIS - Developmental Model of Intercultural Sensitivity. It reflects my experience of the people that I have worked with and provides a useful framework from which to understand how people might respond in various settings. This brief workshop will introduce you to the DMIS and some of its practical applicability’s.

and

What clogs up English in Dutch academia

Joy Burrough-Boenisch, ‎ Independent English-language consultant at Unclogged English

A wry look at features of Dutch language and culture transferred unintentionally into written English by academics and universities, thereby bemusing or amusing non-Dutch readers.

7. (No longer available)

CEFR levels/ERK

Estelle Meima, Coordinator Testing and Assessment; Lecturer in English, Language Centre, University Groningen

With the university becoming increasingly more international, it has become clear that communication skills are essential; however, to expect all university employees to possess the same levels of language or intercultural competence is unrealistic. Therefore, the university is working to create a system where it becomes transparent which competences are expected from an employee depending on their tasks and their working environment. The result is a specific language and intercultural communication profile for each position. In this workshop, we will describe how this system works, create such a profile for each participant and clarify what this means for him or her.

8.

Unconscious bias @ work

Chuck Stephens, Head of Diversity & Inclusion - EMEA, Google

Cassiano Mecchi, Human Resources Business Partner, Diversity & Inclusion

This activity will help groups understand how unconscious bias can affect work culture. We will talk about real examples of bias using models from Google, how they manifest, and how to avoid them in day-to-day work.

9.

Bridging Academic Cultural Differences

Jellina Timmer, Trainer, Educational Advisor Higher Education, Educational Support & Innovation, University Groningen

What are the common areas of academic cultural differences? What part do learning theories (e.g. constructivism) play in these differences? How to bridge the gap between the academic cultures?

Academic cultural differences often lead to misunderstandings, frustrations and feelings of discouragement. In this workshop we will collaboratively explore the five common areas of academic cultural differences. Suggestions on how to deal with these differences, and with your students’ prior learning experiences, will be discussed. Your collective experiences, together with the literature, will be of great value in developing a deeper understanding.

10. (No longer available )

Cultural improvisation: more than words

Frank Odijk, theatre-maker improvisation and intercultural communication

During this interactive workshop we will play improvisational theatre. The words coming out of the mouth of the actor are not that interesting. Their facial expressions, gestures, emotions, silence, that is what captivates us and pulls us into the story. Nonverbal communication makes up the largest part of communication and crosses more borders than we think. The only thing you need to do is to be open to the other, and be willing to reach them. Can you understand someone without depending on whether you understand what he says? Improvisational theatre is based on a couple of values, including accepting, trust in yourself and others, cooperation, conviction, and, most importantly, everything may go wrong!


Lunch

Afternoon Sessions 14.00 - 15.30

1. (No longer available )

Innovation & Intercultural Competence

Michaela Carriere, project leader & trainer intercultural competence, Language Centre, University Groningen

Description follows

2.

Alumnus story: From an international student to a Dutch writer

Vinnie Ko, alumnus University Groningen; PhD candidate Statistics and Biostatistics University of Oslo

Vinnie Ko came to Groningen in 2009 as an international student. In the beginning, he sticks to his English. But when he learns Dutch, Groningen suddenly becomes much bigger and he goes through a set of adventures. After his study, he writes columns (in Dutch) about his experience on the website of De Groene Amsterdammer, one of the oldest newsmagazines in the Netherlands. His first book Met hartelijke groente will be published at the end of November 2016.

In his presentation, Vinnie will tell his successes and obstacles of his integration process in a humorous and witty manner.

and

What we can learn from AFS: Lessons for exchange

Hanneke Boode, study adviser at the Faculty of Arts, trainer intercultural competence at Language Centre, AFS- volunteer

and

Inga Menke , Partner Development, Training and Project Coordinator,European Federation for Intercultural Learning (EFIL)

We encourage our students to study a semester abroad, but we rarely prepare them for this adventure.  What can the University of Groningen learn from other organizations that have made intercultural  exchanges their core business? AFS is the oldest and largest (non-profit) intercultural exchange organization, active in more than fifty countries. Yearly more than 10 000 students participate in an AFS program worldwide. AFS has found that intercultural awareness and the development of intercultural competences are pivotal to a successful exchange experience.  It has therefore developed a supportive learning approach for participants prior, during and after the intercultural experience. This presentation will describe the AFS approach from both the experiential (learners) perspective and from the strategic/policy perspective.

3.

Language and Culture Policy Best Practices in 20 minutes each

Faculty representatives

-         Economics and Business Faculty Association (EBF), Faculty Economics and Business,The next step towards internationalisation

Internationalisation is an ideal and as EBF we aim to achieve this to the best of our abilities and intentions’. As EBF we strive to create an international atmosphere in which both Dutch and international students feel embraced. One of our policy points of this year is internationalisation. In this presentation we would like to shed our light on our experiences and our aspirations for the future.

-         Nienke Bastiaans, Faculty of Economics and Business,The critical mass

How did the support department of Education & Communication Services at FEB become more inclusive? This session describes measures and developments within the department of ECS to become more international and inclusive. How did we organise our language and hiring policies? This session also focuses on our mainstreaming of internationalisation, and the different trainings and workshops in the field we offer within the department and faculty. It all had quite some impact on our departmental culture. Examples will be described.

-        Rob Bakels, UMCG, Exposing the hidden curriculum

It seems so straightforward: a curriculum basically consists of learning outcomes, study material and activities students must fulfil in order to obtain their degree. This is sometimes known as the “formal curriculum”. Besides, other activities and services are available to students. They may be organized by the university or by the student organizations and do not form part of the formal study programme (although they may support learning). This is the “informal curriculum”. However, both these programmes contain many implicit or hidden signals, bewildering to those students who are not Dutch or who have taken their secondary education in another country (“hidden curriculum”).

In this workshop, I would like to explore these signals with the participants and to discuss the extent to which they may act as inhibitors for the learning of our international students. I will finish with sharing the attempts we have taken thus far in exposing the hidden curriculum, with the ultimate goal to provide as level a playing field as possible for all students.

-         T.B.V. LUGUS, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Different nationalities, equal opportunities
Lugus will talk about how their study association of Industrial Engineering & Management has internationalized over the last couple of years. In 2013 the study became English and the association had to follow. This process proved to be challenging but also very rewarding - for both Dutch and international students!

4. (Fully Booked)

Eyes on China

Dr. Jan van der Putten, author and speaker on China; former journalist

China has modernized at breathtaking speed, but this has not led to its westernization – on the contrary: traditional Chinese culture is flourishing. Anyone travelling in China, wishing to do business with China or wishing to understand China’s behaviour as a new global power will inevitably come into contact with the country’s culture. This is the theme of Jan van der Putten’s interactive presentation.

and

Women in China

Bettine Vriesekoop, former table tennis player and correspondent; author and speaker on China

In the years after her time there as correspondent for NRC Handelsblad, Bettine Vriesekoop returned to Beijing regularly. She was particularly fascinated by the role of women, in the past and in the present. The starting point is her visit to the tomb of Qiu Jin, the original Chinese feminist. Just like the legendary Mulan and her descendants, Qui Jin was a swordswoman, a warrior; she also dressed in men's clothes, but in her case as a political protest. So how do women in modern China view themselves? What influence do Taoism and Confucianism have on women's sexuality? Vriesekoop meets women and girls, students, feminists, lesbians, an ex-prostitute, gender experts and a modern ‘swordswoman’. They are the vanguard of an emancipation wave that started after the open door politics of Deng Xiaoping, the one-child policy and the Student Revolt of 1989. But do they have any real influence? Has the sexual revolution passed the current generation of women by, or are the daughters of Mulan busy changing China?

  • T.B.V.Lugas, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Different nationalities, equal opportunities.

Lugus will talk about how their study association of Industrial Engineering & Management has internationalized over the last couple of years. In 2013 the study became English and the association had to follow. This process proved to be challenging but also very rewarding - for both Dutch and international students!

5.

Avoiding Dutchisms and Dutchness in your academic or scientific English

Joy Burrough-Boenisch, ‎ Independent English-language consultant at Unclogged English

Writing English as a second (or third) language is difficult. You will probably make learner errors and, inevitably, aspects of your first language (including conventions about writing) will seep into your writing. Regular textbooks, language courses and computer software deal with the common language errors in English, but not with the errors caused by interference from the non-native-English author’s native language. In this workshop, which will be a mix of Powerpoint presentations and hands-on exercises, you’ll learn to recognise some of the subtler Dutchisms that scholars and scientists unintentionally transfer into written English. We’ll examine linguistic errors and Dutch stylistic traits, and also how the “Dutch” view of the world may affect the assumptions underlying your text. You will also be given practical tips on minimising Dutchisms in your future writing.

6.

Unconscious bias @ work

Chuck Stephens, Head of Diversity & Inclusion - EMEA, Google

Cassiano Mecchi, Human Resources Business Partner, Diversity & Inclusion

This activity will help groups understand how unconscious bias can affect work culture. We will talk about real examples of bias using models from Google, how they manifest, and how to avoid them in day-to-day work.

7.

The dynamic of using English at Dutch Universities

Marjolijn Verspoor, professor of English Language and English as a Second Language University Groningen

There is no question that English has become the lingua franca at our international university and although we are very pleased to have international colleagues and students, there is also a genuine fear in the Netherlands that English will slowly but surely replace Dutch completely. This paper addresses the dynamics of language change-- both in society as a whole and in each individual--and argue that this fear is unfounded. Still, in order to make sure our Dutch students will be able to work professionally both in Dutch and in English, both languages will need attention.

and

Luistertaal

Jan ten Thije, assistant professor Utrecht Institute for Linguistics; lecturer Department of Languages, Literature and Communication, University Utrecht

Lingua Receptiva in Academia

Lingua Receptiva (LaRa) concerns a multilingual communication mode in which in interactants employ a language and/or language variety different from their partner’s and understand each other without any additional lingua franca.  Understanding is possible because the recipients activate knowledge of the language and/or variety of their interlocutor(s) (Rehbein, ten Thije Verschik 2012). Lingua Receptiva is related to other concepts such as Mutual Intelligibility (Gooskens 2007), Intercomprehension (Grin 2008) or Receptive Multilingualism (ten Thije & Zeevaert 2007), however, in LaRa the language choice is not restricted to the mother tongues of interlocutors, but can also include language varieties interlocutors are most comfortable with in the given situation. This communicative mode has been investigated at the workplace, in the army, communication between salespersons and customers, and during meetings in administration. Can Lingua Receptiva also be applied in educational settings?

8.

Diversity & inclusion

Lencola Sullivan Shell, diversity & inclusion officer at Shell

An inclusive working environment exists where differences are valued and where everyone has the opportunity to develop their personal skills and talents and thus productively contribute to the organization. It is important tounderstand about differences and similarities to contribute to an inclusive workplace.

During this workshop you will be invited to explore inclusive and exclusive behaviors in the workplace. You will review specific behaviors and learn more about how this can occur, how you can respond to and learn from it.

9. (No longer available )

Supervising theses

Klaas van Veen, director of the teacher education programme, University Groningen

Some lecturers find that supervising (diverse) students who are writing their thesis is one of the most inspiring forms of teaching. However, supervision of students in the final phase of their degree programme often gives rise to questions or problems. Areas of possible academic cultural differences in supervising thesis students will be discussed as well. There will be ample opportunity to share your experiences with your fellow participants and the course leader, and to discuss possible solutions.

10. (No longer available )

Stranger things have happened

Improv Comedy Group

Description follows

Laatst gewijzigd:04 november 2016 11:01