Skip to ContentSkip to Navigation
About usNews and EventsNews

Top-level research reveals secrets of distant galaxies thanks to an ERC grant

15 March 2017

Looking at distant galaxies is looking at the past. Astronomer Karina Caputi conducts research on galaxies that are so far away that the light she now measures was emitted billions of years ago. The data she collects provide information about what the universe was like a few billion years after the Big Bang. This furthers our understanding of how the universe came into being and how it evolved. Karina Caputi is one of the researchers who received an ERC grant.

Caputi discovered, among other things, that the oldest of the large galaxies, four times the size of our Milky Way, were formed just a billion years after the Big Bang. That is much earlier than was previously believed. She hopes to confirm her findings using the James Webb telescope, the largest telescope ever sent into space, which will be launched in 2018.

Caputi's research project is partly funded by a grant provided by the European Research Council (ERC). The ERC has been awarding grants to excellent researchers since 2007, thus stimulating groundbreaking research in Europe. Over the past decade, University of Groningen researchers have been awarded over 50 ERC grants. Karina Caputi is one of the researchers who received an ERC grant. She unravels the secrets of the universe by studying distant galaxies.

More information

University of Groningen videos

The weekly online video magazine Unifocus highlights topics related to the University of Groningen in the fields of research and society, student life, teaching, policy and internationalization.
You can find more videos in our video portal.

Last modified:05 April 2019 11.52 a.m.

More news

  • 23 April 2019

    From paperclip to patent

    How is it possible that an albatross doesn’t crash and die when it lands? And how come its large wings don’t break due to air resistance? That is what you would expect, according to the laws of aerodynamics. However, Professor Eize Stamhuis has discovered...

  • 17 April 2019

    Why lightning often strikes twice

    In contrast to popular belief, lightning often does strike twice, but the reason why a lightning channel is ‘reused’ has remained a mystery. Now, an international research team led by the University of Groningen has used the LOFAR radio telescope to...

  • 16 April 2019

    Still going strong after four decades

    On March 29th professor of Applied Physics Jeff de Hosson was offered a farewell symposium, a few months after his official retirement date near the close of 2018. ‘But 29 March was the 100th birthday of Jan Francken, my predecessor.’ Besides, De Hosson...