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Research Globalisation Studies Groningen (GSG) Education

Minor Development Studies

ECTS: 2 X 15 ECTS
Code: MILET48A & MILET48B

Are you interested in economics, politics and culture in developing countries? Are you interested in how people in Africa, Asia and Latin America deal with global issues such as climate change, population & migration questions, foreign companies, Foreign Direct Investment, and social transformationst? The Minor Development Studies offers you a range of courses from different academic disciplines – it is a truly interdisciplinary Minor that will enable you to approach these issues from a critical point of view.

The Minor
In the age of globalization, richer and poorer countries share many problems, such as inequality and poverty, concentration of power in the hands of the few, marginalisation of minorities, limited access to health services and education, and failing political institutions. However, such problems take different forms in many African and Asian countries. The Minor programme seeks to enable you to understand their realities, their points of view, as well as current good practices in local and global development. The programme includes elementary and advanced courses, such as development economics, social change, population, environment, culture, politics, and development cooperation. It also offers two very attractive integrative courses with intensive learning in smaller groups and research essay writing on topics of your own choice. There is also the option of participating in our Summer School on Development Studies in Tanzania. These intensive programmes gives you a unique chance to experience village life in Tanzania, to interact with Tanzanian and other international students, and to do your field work with local communities.

Future career options
Whether your future career is in government, banking, NGOs, health, or a water- or energy company, global operations may be part of your work and you will require insight into development problems as well as change-management skills. For those who want to continue in a Master programme in Development Studies or proceed into a career in international development NGOs this minor is a must. For a global-minded student, this will be a study semester to enjoy and remember!

Course details
You can choose six or five courses out of the total Minor package of ten courses. All courses are offered in the English language and in the first semester (September to end of January). If the complete Minor does not fit your study schedule you can follow most courses also separately, as electives or you can spread the Minor over two years of study.  

The Minor Development Studies is an interfaculty minor (so its courses are offered by different faculties) and it is open for students from all faculties. If a single course is organised by your own faculty, you can follow it as part of an ‘external minor’.

Most courses can be followed as single courses also without following the complete Minor packages. The single courses can be followed for free as an addition to your current studies (also if you are a Master student). However we can-not guarantee that the ECTS will count towards your total score. You will have to discuss this with your own faculty.

Courses per semester
The DS1 programme consists of the five courses of which you choose three:
1) Environment & Development, 2) Ethnicity, Culture, Politics, 3) Trade, Aid and Beyond: Dutch international development policy, past and present, 4) Social & Institutional Change, and 5) Climate Change, End Times and Sustainable Futures.

The DS2 programme consists of four courses from which you choose three:
1) Global Development Studies, 2) Population & Development, 3) Topical Themes in Development, 4) Reading Seminar : Key Debates in Development Studies . The last two courses are advanced courses within the Minor and only open for those who have finished at least two courses of block 1A of the Minor, or have finished one of such courses and are simultaneously following in block 1B either Global Development Studies or Population & Development. In Topical Themes students are coached in a small-group setting while developing an individual paper.  This course can be exchanged for one of our summer schools. The Reading Seminar consists of discussions using different dynamcs on key texts in the development literature.

Course and enrollment period

Progress Code

ECTS

Period

DS I package - semester Ia:

Social and Institutional Change

(enrollment: 18 May - 31 July 2020)

SOBA904
Organised by:
Faculty of Behavioural and Social Sciences

5 Semester Ia

Ethnicity, Culture and Politics

(enrollment: 15 June - 26 June 2020)

LBA025B05
Organised by:
Faculty of Arts

5

Semester Ia

Trade, Aid and Beyond: Dutch international development policy, past and present

(enrollment: 15 June - 26 June 2020)

LBU051B05
Organised by:
Faculty of Arts

5 Semester Ia

Environment and Development

(enrollment: 15 June - 26 June 2020)

WBEE001-05
Organised by:
Faculty of Sciences and Engineering

5

Semester Ia

Climate Change, End Times and Sustainable Futures

(enrollment: 3 June - 30 August 2020)

THB3-CCET
Organised by:
Faculty of Theology and Religious Studies

5 Semester Ia

Migration and Development

GEMIGRDEV
Organized by:
Faculty of Spatial Sciences
10 Semester 1a
DS II package - semester Ib:

Global Development Studies

(enrollment: 1 August - 3 November 2020)

EBB921B05
Organised by:
Faculty of Business and Economics

5

Semester Ib

Topical Themes in Development Studies (only for minor package students)

(enrollment: 1 August - 3 November 2020)

EBB922A05
Organised by:
Faculty of Business and Economics

5

Semester Ib

Reading Seminar: Key Debates in Development Studies

(15 June - 26 June 2020)

LBA016B05
Organised by:
Faculty of Arts

5

Semester Ib

Population and Development (option)

(enrollment: Mid October - 3 November 2020)

GEPOPDEV
Organised by: Faculty of Spatial Sciences.

5

Semester Ib

Summer School on Development Studies in Tanzania (option within Topical Themes course) Registration deadline: 15 May

Visit website
Organised by:
Globalisation Studies Groningen

5

Semester Ib

Course Descriptions

Environment & Development
This course analyses causes of environmental problems at the local, national and international levels, discussing issues such as depletion of natural resources; democracy and good environmental governance; globalisation and the international dimension of environmental problems; biofuels and food production, and the “greening” of development. It also reviews possible policies and strategies for environmental improvement, using case-studies from different countries and sectors. Coordinator: dr. M.R. Berger (Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences) block 1a course code WBEE001-05.

Ethnicity, Culture, Politics
This course discusses processes of cultural, social and political change in development and globalisation (such as indigenous patterns of social organisation, patrimonialism, state formation and restructuring, and civil society development). It gives special attention to culture and the ways in which identity and community are ‘imagined’ in the form of politicised identity struggles around ethnicity, nationalism and cosmopolitanism. Such identity politics relates to change and conflict in both our multicultural societies and development societies. Lecturer: dr. Pieter Boele van Hensbroek (Globalisation Studies Groningen) block 1a course code LBA025B05.

Trade, Aid and Beyond: Dutch international development policy, past and present
This course introduces you to the historical and political development of the international system of development cooperation as it evolved from 1945 onwards, taking Dutch policy development and execution and Dutch perspectives as a starting point. We will discuss the “aid or trade” dilemma that was (and to a point still is) central to Dutch development policy and how this translates into international relations and policies. We will also discuss how the epistemology of the concepts of development and international development relations changed over time and what this means for our current understanding. Special attention will be given on postcolonial contexts such as in Africa, and the role of international organizations.

Social and Institutional Change
This course discusses the roles of cultural norms and institutional rules in economic life in general and in socio-economic development in particular. It discusses insights from recent development in new economic sociology, neo-institutional economics, as well as cross-cultural social psychology. Topics include: problems of measuring the quality of life; the role of cultural and institutional contexts in development theory; differences in national and organizational cultures; the role of gender arrangements, legal institutions, religious beliefs, and social capital; the social embeddedness of markets, entrepreneurship, and ‘ethnic economies’; and the problems of bringing insights from social theory into practice. Coordinator: dr. V.M.K. Seibel (Faculty of Behavioural and Social Sciences) block 1a course code SOBA904.

Climate Change, End Times and Sustainable Futures
Climate change is arguably one of the greatest challenges facing the planet in the 21st century. How to effectively respond to climate change and prepare for new social, political, economic, moral and environmental realities are urgent issues that need to be addressed across all levels of society. What are the visions and resources available across different theological, philosophical and spiritual traditions for understanding and responding to climate change? How do these different visions influence the ways in which various groups and actors interpret climate change and the solutions they offer (or don’t offer)? This course explores these and other questions through a consideration of eschatological end times visions, the promotion of technology and economy as effective solutions to the climate change challenge, alongside ethical and existential questions regarding humanity’s relationship to and responsibility for nature and future generations.

Migration and Development
Migration is a powerful mechanism in the social and economic dynamics both of migrants themselves and of the places that are involved in migration. At the regional level, for example, we observe that human capital is an increasingly important determinant of economic development. Migration of skilled employees therefore importantly shapes regional differences in economic growth. At the other end, we see places that lose people as a result of migration and suffer the social and economic consequences. At the individual level, migration may be a means to improve your socio-economic position, for example when searching for a new job, or perhaps when running from harsh political circumstances. Migration thus plays a key-role in the lives of people as well as for the regions people live and work. Understanding process of migration is therefore key in understanding the socio-economic development of people and places.

This course is dedicated to the mutual relationship between migration and the economic and social development of people and places. It offers theories to understand why people migrate and the outcomes of migration. At the same time, theories that highlight the role of human capital and migration in regional development are explored. In addition, the course aims at providing the latest research and trends about migration flows within and between countries as well as the changing economic and social framework in which migration takes place.

Global Development Studies
This course gives a broad overview of development issues. The core of the course is the explanation of low income levels in developing countries and why some countries have successfully overcome this condition. Explanations involve economic factors as well as demographic, social, historical, ecological and institutions ones. Lecturer: dr. Gaaitzen de Vries (Faculty Economics & Business) block 1b; course code EBB921B05 .

Reading Seminar: Key Debates in Development Studies
In this course we discuss some of the most important readings and theoretical currents in Development Studies in a seminar group setting, providing students with deeper understanding of development issues. In this highly rated course, students encounter the most important classical and contemporary debates. Topics of reading and discussion include: Paradigms in Development Thinking, Theories of Globalisation, Rural Development, Globalisation of Production, Democracy and Civil Society, and Aid. This is an advanced course within the Minor and is only open for those who have finished at least two courses from Block 1a of the Minor, or have finished one of such courses and are simultaneously following in Block 1b either Global Development Studies (GDS) or Population & Development (PopDev). Block 1b course code LBA016B05.

Topical Themes in Development
This course aims at providing an in-depth understanding of a particular set of problems in development, working in a small-group setting with a mentor-lecturer. Writing your own research essay is the core of this course. Students can choose from a number of theme groups including: Economic Development, Social and political development of Africa , The pros and cons of globalization, Education in development, Environmentally sustainable development. This is an advanced course within the Minor and is only open for those who have finished at least two courses from Block 1a of the Minor, or have finished one of such courses and are simultaneously following in Block 1b either Global Development Studies (GDS) or Population & Development (PopDev). Coordinators: dr. Pieter Boele van Hensbroek (GSG) and dr. Bartjan Pennink (Faculty of Business and Economics) block 1b course code EBB922A05.

This course can be exchanged for participating in one of our Summer Schools at the end of the academic year and writing the research essay on the field work done in that framework (see below).

Population & Development
This is a taught course that aims at understanding differences in fertility, mortality, and migration across regions and countries, taking an interdisciplinary approach (biological, socio-cultural, and economic). Topics include: health, poverty, urbanisation, nutrition, culture, ageing, HIV-AIDS and population policy. Coordinator: dr.Billy de Haas (Faculty of Spatial Sciences); block 1b course code GEOPODEV

Summer School Programmes
These Intensive Progammes bring together students in the summer break at the end of the academic year (July or August). After solid preparation during the minor, there is a programme of lectures, seminars, excursions and field work allowing students to experience developing problems first hand and to develop their knowledge in development issues further. Any of these programmes can be followed as an optional form of the Topical Themes course. Students have to make their own travel arrangements and pay a fee for upkeep and local transport. Block 1b course code EBB922A05. Registration via ProgressWWW for Minor students. External registrations available on: https://www.rug.nl/education/summer-winter-schools/development_studies/

Admission and registration
The minor is open to students from all faculties, most courses can be followed separately as an elective course. Registration for the minor and in addition for each course separately (!!) at ProgRessWWW. Registration for the minor starts on the 18th of May on the day of the Minor Market and ends on the 1st of August. Registration for individual courses of the minor are stated in the first column of the table above.

Late registration for the Minor and its Faculty of Arts courses can be requested - GSG office manager Mr. Jarno Hoving: j.hoving@rug.nl.

More i nformation:
Globalisation Studies Groningen, University of Groningen
Tel. +31 50 3632391;
Email: gsg@rug.nl or a.c.rodrigues-vasse@rug.nl

Last modified:10 August 2020 2.13 p.m.