Skip to ContentSkip to Navigation
About usNews and EventsNews articles

A comic strip about dialect research

04 December 2017

Not all researchers make a comic strip about their research, but language researcher Martijn Wieling of the Information Science department did. Wieling uses an articulograph to the study tongue movements of dialect users. The comic strip allows him to explain his research in a different way and to a different audience. And he learned a lot from it, too.

‘Partly because the data were collected from children and young people, a comic strip seemed a nice way to reach these target groups’, says Wieling. ‘The comic strip is about my research, but also shows what conducting research is like; brainstorming about an idea, collecting data and processing it, presenting at a congress, submitting an article, revising and eventually publishing it. Plus, that conducting research requires perseverance.’ Making the comic strip took a lot more time than expected, but Wieling is very pleased with the result. What I learned from it? That you can’t explain too much and must formulate clearly and concisely. I am now much better prepared for a 2-minute pitch. The nice thing about the comic strip is that it’s here to stay. It’s a good visiting card and give-away summary of my research. People will read it sooner than two pages full of text.’

Last modified:09 January 2018 1.40 p.m.
printView this page in: Nederlands

More news

  • 20 May 2019

    Forthcoming honorary doctor Philipp Blom: an off-road historian

    Before we met, historian and philosopher Philipp Blom was told that he would be interviewed about his work and mission. Work okay, but a mission? ‘I don’t have one,’ says Philipp Blom on the phone from Vienna in fluent Dutch. ‘I’m curious and I like...

  • 06 May 2019

    The tracks of a camp commander

    Journalist and TV producer Ad van Liempt describes in his biography how Albert Gemmeker, commander of Westerbork camp during the war, got away with his actions, but lived in fear of new punishment every day for years in Germany.

  • 02 May 2019

    Camp commander Gemmeker lived in fear of new trial for years

    He was the friendly face of Nazi evil: Albert Gemmeker, commander of Westerbork transit camp. He got away with a mild sentence but remained the subject of a judicial investigation in Germany for many years after. Journalist and television producer...