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EU boost for polar science

Arctic Centre of the University of Groningen represents the Netherlands in international consourtium.
19 May 2015
The Arctic

A new initiative to enhance the integration of Europe’s scientific and operational capabilities in the Polar Regions has been funded by the EU Horizon 2020 programme. The €2 million five-year EU-PolarNet programme brings together 22 of Europe’s internationally-respected multi-disciplinary research institutions to develop and deliver an integrated European polar research programme that is supported by access to first-class operational polar infrastructures. The Arctic Centre of the University of Groningen is representing the Netherlands in this consourtium. EU-PolarNet will involve stakeholders from the outset to create a suite of research proposals whose scientific outcomes are directly relevant and beneficial to European society and its economy.

Polar issues have been rising up the political agenda across Europe over the past decade. The level of investment now being made by governments is a clear demonstration of how critical polar research is for forming policies, including those relating to climate change, energy security, global food security, innovation and economic growth.

By establishing an ongoing dialogue between policymakers, business and industry leaders, local communities and scientists EU-PolarNet aims to create an Integrated European Research Programme for the Antarctic and the Arctic. This legacy from EU-PolarNet will be sustained into the future by the European Polar Board, all of whose members are integrally involved with the project.

New home for science and innovation on polar issues

A key role for EU-PolarNet is to cooperate closely with the European Commission to provide support and advice on all issues related to the Polar Regions. Dr Andrea Tilche, Head of the Climate Action and Earth Observation Unit, in the European Commission DG for Research and Innovation, comments: "The European Commission welcomes this new Coordination Action which brings together polar scientific communities and other stakeholders. It creates a new "home" where science and innovation on polar issues can be discussed for the benefit of our planet and our societies". Watch a presentation on EU Polar Net by Alfred Wegener Institute Director ms Karin Lochte here.

Exciting time for polar science

EU-PolarNet is coordinated by the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research in Germany. The Arctic Centre of the University of Groningen is representing the Netherlands in this consourtium. Professor Peter Jordan comments:

“We are very pleased to be part of the EU-PolarNet. It has always been out ambition to further enhance the high-level of collaboration and cooperation that exists currently across Europe and the rest of the world.  Our network is ideally positioned to play a leading international role in forming new partnerships across the scientific, business and policy-making communities.  The knowledge and discoveries that we make in the polar regions have an impact on all our daily lives.  This is a very exciting time for polar science within both the Netherlands and Europe."

EU-Polarnet is a Horizon 2020 funded Coordination Action. Full information about the programme and its participants is at www.eu-polarnet.eu

More information

For more information, please contact prof Peter Jordan, director of the Arctic Centre of the University of Groningen. Phone +31 50-3635954, email p.d.jordan@rug.nl

Last modified:12 March 2020 9.47 p.m.
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