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First-years get to know Groningen

11 August 2014
Registration at the Academy Building
Registration at the Academy Building

Monday is the first official day at university for many first-year students – they are taking part in KEI week, the first-year introduction week. New students get to know the city, student life and the University facilities. This is the 46th KEI week, 5,275 first-years (an all-time record) take part.

During KEI week the first-years are divided into small groups headed by senior students. They are introduced to all aspects of student city Groningen, including sports clubs and organizations for part-time jobs, and ranging from study support to night life, not forgetting student associations and their fellow first-years. For many students, the KEI gives them a flying start at the University and is the ideal way to get to know their new city. On Monday there is a large information market on the Vismarkt where KEI participants can learn about many different organizations. In the evening there will be an opening party on the Grote Markt.

Information market
Information market
Last modified:13 August 2014 08.25 a.m.
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