Skip to ContentSkip to Navigation
About usNews and EventsNews articles

A road map for suicide research

22 May 2014

Policy-makers, funders, researchers and clinicians should act now to tackle high suicide rates, write André Aleman (University Medical Center Groningen) and Damiaan Denys (Academic Medical Center Amsterdam) in a Comment piece in this week’s Nature. Despite the enormous societal impact of suicide, the authors explain, little progress has been made in the scientific understanding or treatment of suicidal behaviour.

Almost 1 million people kill themselves every year - more than the number that die in homicides and war combined. A further 10 million to 20 million people attempt it. Suicide is one of the three leading causes of death in the economically most-productive age group - those aged 15–44 years - and rates have risen since the economic crisis triggered by the banking crash in 2008.

Funding for research

Despite this, argue Aleman and Denys, suicide research is underfunded and understudied. The authors call for four steps: recognition that suicidality is a distinct disorder, research into its mechanisms, earmarked funding for its study, and evidence-based prevention programmes. “Coordinated efforts are clearly needed from public-health authorities, clinicians and scientists,” they conclude.

Last modified:15 September 2017 3.34 p.m.

More news

  • 17 April 2019

    Why lightning often strikes twice

    In contrast to popular belief, lightning often does strike twice, but the reason why a lightning channel is ‘reused’ has remained a mystery. Now, an international research team led by the University of Groningen has used the LOFAR radio telescope to...

  • 17 April 2019

    Annita Kobes, Fleur Middel en Pieter van Rees met Fulbright beurs naar VS

    Annita Kobes, Fleur Middel en Pieter van Rees, alle drie promovendi aan de Faculteit Gedrags- en Maatschappijwetenschappen, krijgen een Fulbright scholarship toegewezen. Met deze beurs kunnen zij drie maanden onderzoek doen in de Verenigde Staten.

  • 16 April 2019

    Still going strong after four decades

    On March 29th professor of Applied Physics Jeff de Hosson was offered a farewell symposium, a few months after his official retirement date near the close of 2018. ‘But 29 March was the 100th birthday of Jan Francken, my predecessor.’ Besides, De Hosson...