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Research ESRIG - Energy and Sustainability Research Institute Groningen Centre for Isotope Research - CIO

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Uitzending Meldpunt | Leeftijd van port is vaak jonger dan op etiket | CIO onderzoekt met behulp van koolstof-14 metingen
Posted on:17 January 2022

Hoe ouder een port wijn hoe lekkerder, maar ook hoe duurder. Een 20 jaar oude port kost tussen de 30 en 35 euro. Maar is de port in de fles ook echt zo oud als het etiket aangeeft? Meldpunt laat flessen port onderzoeken door het Centrum voor Isotopen Onderzoek (CIO) van de Universiteit van Groningen. Met behulp van koolstof-14 metingen stellen zij de exacte leeftijd van de port vast.

In Science - Podcast | Prof. Mike Dee
Posted on:08 December 2021

In Science is the University of Groningen podcast where we interview researchers and bring you the latest news and reports from the academic community in Groningen. Our guest this episode is Mike Dee. He's an associate professor of Isotope Chronology at our Centre of Isotope Research. Wim, Tina and Arjen interview him on how he and Margot Kuitems were able to show that Europeans were already active in the Americas in 1021 AD.

Europeans in the Americas 1000 years ago
Posted on:20 October 2021

Columbus was not the first European to reach the Americas. The Vikings got there centuries beforehand, although exactly when has remained unclear. Here, an international team of scientists show that Europeans were already active in the Americas in 1021 AD.

The Vikings sailed great distances in their iconic longships. To the west, they established settlements in Iceland, Greenland and eventually a base at L’Anse aux Meadows, Newfoundland, Canada. However, it has remained unclear when this first transatlantic activity took place. Here, scientists show that Europeans were present in the Americas in 1021 AD - precisely 1000 years ago this year. This date also marks the earliest known point by which the Atlantic had been crossed, and migration by humankind had finally encircled the entire planet.

The Integrated Carbon Observation System in Europe
Posted on:18 October 2021

The increasing amount of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere is causing our climate to warm at an alarming rate. The consequent changes are unprecedented, and difficult to predict due to the complexity of the Earth system. While we know that half of the carbon emissions released to the atmosphere by fossil fuel usage are re-captured by the ocean and land ecosystems, we still lack knowledge when it comes to the exact size, nature and stabilities of these carbon sinks and how these will be affected by climate change. How these sinks operate in detail, and if they indeed continue to work is vital information for societies, that must decide on pathways to climate neutrality.

Upcoming thesis defence on June 18, 2021: Ballast water treatment system testing. Assessing novel treatments and validating compliance methods
Posted on:03 June 2021

Friday 18 June, upcoming thesis defence: Ballast water treatment system testing. Assessing novel treatments and validating compliance methods, C. van Slooten

UKRANT: How did prehistoric people deal with climate change? Atlantis in the North Sea
Posted on:11 March 2021

Down in the deep dark waters of the North Sea lies Doggerland, which disappeared thousands of years ago due to the rising sea levels. Groningen archaeologists are trying to find out how the area’s inhabitants dealt with the rising water.

Massive Southern Ocean phytoplankton bloom fed by iron of possible hydrothermal origin
Posted on:23 February 2021

Primary production in the Southern Ocean (SO) is limited by iron availability. Hydrothermal vents have been identified as a potentially important source of iron to SO surface waters. Here we identify a recurring phytoplankton bloom in the high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll waters of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current in the Pacific sector of the SO, that we argue is fed by iron of hydrothermal origin. In January 2014 the bloom covered an area of ~266,000 km2 with depth-integrated chlorophyll a > 300 mg m−2, primary production rates >1 g C m−2 d−1, and a mean CO2 flux of −0.38 g C m−2 d−1. The elevated iron supporting this bloom is likely of hydrothermal origin based on the recurrent position of the bloom relative to two active hydrothermal vent fields along the Australian Antarctic Ridge and the association of the elevated iron with a distinct water mass characteristic of a nonbuoyant hydrothermal vent plume.

Upcoming thesis defence on June 8, 2020: Unlocking Microalgal Treasures - Utilization of palm oil mill effluent as growth medium for the production of value-added microalgal compounds
Posted on:28 May 2020

Monday 8 June, upcoming thesis defence: Unlocking Microalgal Treasures - Utilization of palm oil mill effluent as growth medium for the production of value-added microalgal compounds, M.M. Azimatun Nur

Upcoming thesis defence on October 6, 2020: Hidden threats revealed - Potentially toxic microalga species and their associated toxins in Ambon Bay, Eastern Indonesia
Posted on:28 May 2020

Tuesday 6 October, upcoming thesis defence: Hidden threats revealed - Potentially toxic microalga species and their associated toxins in Ambon Bay, Eastern Indonesia, S. Likumahua