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ResearchArctic CentreResearchSustainability of the Arctic AnthropoceneCircumpolar archaeology

Marjolein Admiraal

Prehistoric food technologies, maritime adaptations and climate change in the North Pacific
Marjolein Admiraal
Marjolein Admiraal

This research focuses on the evolution of the form and function of container technologies such as stone bowls and ceramics in SW Alaska and the Aleutians during the past 8000 years. Especially the function of these food technologies is of interest here. Whereas most research in the past has focused on the act of hunting, this project concerns the processing of food after the moment of capture. In order to gain an understanding of what was eaten and how food was prepared a substantial laboratory analysis will be conducted in order to determine the origin of residues found on the archaeological artefacts (e.g. stone bowls and pottery).

It is hypothesized that the introduction of ceramics in the Arctic was related to an increased reliance on maritime resources. Through the employment of organic residue analysis this research may provide direct evidence for or against this hypothesis. But why did maritime resources become increasingly important at this time? Climate change may have played an important role in these processes. It will be attempted to clarify that role and the interplay of various factors in order to answer the main research question: “what factors contributed to the evolution of prehistoric container technologies in SW Alaska and the Aleutians?”


Marjolein Admiraal

Last modified:14 February 2019 5.22 p.m.