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Aletta Jacobs School of Public Health

Together for more healthy years
Research Research themes

Healthy Ageing

Alien van der Sluis
My dream is for every child to grow up in a healthy and stimulating environment. I am contributing as a boundary researcher, bringing together scientific, professional and experiential knowledge. I am experienced in design-based research approaches and have co-developed several interventions on stimulating active healthy lifestyle and self-regulation of children and adolescents from within the school context. Currently, my work consists of developing and evaluating Tijd voor Toekomst (Time for Future), a program for enriched schooldays for children in the province of Groningen with the ambition to create equal chances for growing up healthy and with a promising future. I have a PhD in Human Movement Sciences and work as a senior researcher for the Institute for Sport Sciences at the Hanzehogeschool.

Alien van der Sluis
Alien van der Sluis

Aleid Brouwer
I am Aleid Brouwer, I work as a lecturer at the Faculty of Spatial Science at the University of Groningen and as a full professor at the NHL Stenden University of Applied Science in Leeuwarden. My Aletta research focusses first on ‘housing solutions for an aging population’; answering questions such as where do older adults want to live, what kind of whishes do they have, can they afford to age in place, are they prepared to age in place, do they have the social network to age in place? The second focus is on ‘who cares for the informal care giver’, what are the effects of the participation society for elderly and for the people who will do the caretaking, What are the effect for the caregiver on the long term, in work life balance, career perspectives and health and how can employers take care of their employees that might be overburdened.

Extra keyword: Informal Care

Aleid Brouwer
Aleid Brouwer

Bertus Jeronimus is a developmental and clinical psychologists who studies the co-development of personality, happiness, and internalizing problems over the lifespan. Key interest are personal strengths and vulnerabilities, emotions, the socioecology in which one lives and grows (especially intimate support relationships - family/friends/partners), daily activities, stressful life events (including the coronavirus pandemic), the role of culture and history, personal narratives, and psychiatric taxonomies.  

Extra keyword: Personality

Bertus Jeronimus
Bertus Jeronimus

Han de Ruiter
As of April 1, 2019, I started as a professor in the research domain Value Based Health Care. In the ever-changing healthcare domain, we see that the value(s) of healthcare is becoming more important. That means value for the patient involved, his or her family and the social network. But also value for healthcare professionals. From our university of applied sciences perspective, this mainly concerns the nurses and para medical professions. On the one hand, we look at the care processes and the effective and efficient working method therein and efficient use of (financial) resources. On the other hand, we try to take the perspective of the patient as a starting point in our research. What does value-based care mean from the perspective of the patient, the family, the social network?

Extra keyword: Value Based Healthcare

Han de Ruiter
Han de Ruiter

Louise Meijering
Louise is associate professor in Health Geography and is leading a research programme on Well-being, mobility and attachment to place in later life. Her key contributions to the field have been on the outdoor mobility of older adults; place and identity after stroke; and the multi-dimensionality of well-being in later life. Her work is interdisciplinary, at the intersection of geography, gerontology and public health. Currently, she is leading an ERC-funded project called Meaningful Mobility, in which she aims to develop a novel approach to in- and outdoor movement in later life, in the Netherlands, United Kingdom and India.

Louise Meijering
Louise Meijering

Susan Ketner
Susan Ketner has served as professor of Comprehensive Approach to Child Abuse at Hanze University of Applied Sciences Groningen as of 1 March 2019. Her specific background as a researcher is in diversity, parental support and parenthood. She is keen on using her professorship to improve parental support in families where parents face various types of pressure and where concerns over safety exist. In doing so, she prefers to link up research, education, policy and practice.

Extra keyword: Parenthood

Susan Ketner
Susan Ketner

Klaske Veth
Klaske Veth PhD is a professor in Sustainable HR at Hanze University of Applied Sciences in Groningen. She obtained her PhD at the Radboud University in Nijmegen on the theme Healthy Aging@Work (nominated for best dissertation at International HRM conference). She worked in various (managerial) HR positions and sectors. At the University of Utrecht she completed the postgraduate program Coaching and Consulting in Context. She has completed her initial study Management & Organizational Sciences ('with pleasure') at the University of Tilburg. Within her professorship Klaske Veth focuses on the research lines Well-being@Work (W@W) and Leadership containing topics such as (social psychological) HRM, work engagement, healthy aging, and (personal) leadership. She also gives lectures in (post-) bachelor's and master's degree programs and supervises graduates. She has published in various (inter) national (scientific) journals and presented at (scientific) conferences (inter)nationally.

Klaske Veth
Klaske Veth

Remo Mombarg
dr. Remo Mombarg is a Lector Physical Education (PE) and youth sports at the Hanze University of Applied Sciences. The main goal of this lectorship is to develop knowledge about effective interventions that make children sport, in a pleasant, healthy, and sustainable way. How do we prepare children for a life in sports? Remo has extensive experiences in sportdevelopment for children in vocational education. Recently a project called “selfregulation in sport and health” was funded by the NRO (Dutch council for research). In this project students, researchers, and PE-teachers perform this research, in so called ‘knowledge-working-places’. For children with motor coordination difficulties, such as children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD), we focus on a strong learning environment, that stimulates children to trust their bodies and to enjoy to be physically active. This interaction between students, teachers/researchers, PE-teachers, and children, is highly fruitful for all parties. Children receive extra attention from up-to-date students – who learn to work with less capable children, teachers/researchers can perform their research on-the-job, and PE-teachers see their children grow. This cooperation resulted in many products such as curricula,1 a book chapter,2 television parts,3 and several articles, e.g. on Serious Gaming4,5. Further, one of our colleagues wrote her PhD-thesis on DCD6 and supervises graduate students in their research on, for example, the effects of implicit and explicit learning strategies in children with motor coordination difficulties.

The collaboration between students, teachers/researchers, PE-teachers, and children pays special attention to children with motor coordination difficulties, to help them find a way into sports and to receive compliments, because all children deserve to joyfully participate in sports.

Extra keyword: Physical Education

Remo Mombarg
Remo Mombarg

Jenny van Doorn
My name is Jenny van Doorn, I'm professor of Services Marketing at the Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Groningen. My research focuses on the use of technology in services, in particular the use of robots and artificial intelligence. Use of such technology becomes also more and more common in healthcare and is seen as a potential solution for the challenges that the health care system faces given the increasing health care demand due to ageing populations and personnel shortages. The current generation of technological devices often already goes beyond a mere functional role and also engages its user on a social level, such as a robot doing physical exercises with the elderly or devices using speech technology to remind their users to e.g. take their medicine. In my research I explore how consumers react to such technology, and whether there are ways to overcome reluctance that in particular elderly people may feel to use it.

Extra keyword: Robots and chatbots in healthcare

Jenny van Doorn
Jenny van Doorn
Last modified:26 July 2021 3.53 p.m.