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Molecular Systems Biology

Molecular Systems Biology

Prof. Dr. Matthias Heinemann

Prof. Dr. Matthias Heinemann
Prof. Dr. Matthias Heinemann
Towards a quantitative understanding of dynamic metabolic systems

Cells – from simple bacteria to mammalian cells – are constantly exposed to fluctuating environments in terms of, for example, nutrient availability. Such changes typically require cellular adaptations, which are commonly administered by complex molecular sensing and regulatory machineries. Although many of the players and mechanisms involved are known, we are still far from an actual quantitative understanding of the complex orchestration of these processes. As model systems, we are currently studying the dynamic regulation processes controlling central carbon metabolism in E. coli and S. cerevisiae upon change in nutrient availability.

Here, we follow a systems biology approach combining experimental analyses and mathematical modeling efforts. On the experimental side, we use two different but complementary approaches: As a top-down approach, we analyze and extract mechanistic insight from global omics data. In a bottom-up approach, we study the properties of single cells through microscopic analyses and flow cytometry. By integrating both population averaged and single cell data into computational models, we seek to derive a quantitative understanding of the regulatory processes which explicitly account for phenotypic heterogeneity in clonal populations.

Short resume
2013 -

University of Groningen, Molecular Systems Biology Group

Full Professor

2009 - 2013

University of Groningen, Molecular Systems Biology Group

Associate Professor

2006 - 2010

ETH Zurich, Institute of Molecular Systems Biology

Research group leader in the research unit of Prof. Dr. Uwe Sauer

2004 - 2006

ETH Zurich, Institute of Process Engineering, Bioprocess Lab

Postdoctoral research with Prof. Dr. Sven Panke  

1999 - 2003

RWTH Aachen University, Biochemical Engineering, Germany

PhD: Experimental Analysis, Modeling and Dynamic Simulation of Thermodynamic and Kinetic Phenomena in Gel-Stabilized Enzyme Carriers

1993 - 1999

University of Stuttgart, Germany

Studying Environmental Engineering majoring biochemical and chemical engineering

1997 - 1998

University of Western Ontario, London, Canada

Integrated studies in the Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering


Last modified:January 24, 2014 11:07