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Lecture Philipp Gütlich

Roster

WhenWhere
06 April 2005 FWN-Building 5114.0004, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG, Groningen
Speaker: Prof. Philipp Gütlich
Affiliation: Institut fur Anorganische Chemie und Analytische Chemie, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Germany
Title: In-situ spectroscopy on Mars -- Following the water
Date: Wed Apr 6, 2005
Start: 11.00
Location: FWN-Building 5114.0004
Host: P. van Koningsbruggen
Telephone: +31 50 363 4363

Abstract

The miniaturisation of a Mössbauer spectrometer, initiated by Egbert Kankeleit in the early nineties at the Technical University of Darmstadt and further developed and brought to completion at the Institute of Inorganic Chemistry of the University of Mainz, has led to an instrument which is scaled down by a factor of ca. 100 in size and weight as compared to a standard laboratory spectrometer. The miniaturised Mössbauer spectrometer (MIMOS) was chosen by the European Space Agency (ESA) and by NASA to participate in the Mars missions launched in 2003. The two NASA missions with the Mars exploration rovers (MER) 'Spirit' and 'Opportunity' on board landed successfully in opposite locations of the red planet Mars in January 2004. MIMOS has been functioning extremely well since then. It has recorded hundreds of Mössbauer spectra of fantastic quality, equivalent to those recorded in the laboratory, and sent to earth (JPL, Pasadena) for data reduction and spectral analysis. Many minerals such as olivine, pyroxene, magnetite, hematite and, most significantly, jarosite have been identified by their characteristic hyperfine parameters. Jarosite, a basic sulphate mineral known to grow in wet sulphuric acidic surroundings like volcanic outcrops, turned out to be one of the most exciting discoveries as it evidences the occurrence of water on Mars. These findings have been supported by measurements with an Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) developed at the Max Planck Institute of Chemistry in Mainz.

Two reports on the current Mars exploration have recently appeared in Science [1,2]. This journal has chosen the results of the Mars exploration as 'breakthrough of the year 2004'.

[1] Mineralogy at Gusev crater from the Mössbauer spectrometer on the Spirit rover.
R. V. Morris, G. Klingelhöfer, B. Bernhardt, C. Schröder, D. S. Rodionov, P. A. de Souza, A. Yen, R. Gellert, E. N. Evlanov, J. Foh, E. Kankeleit, P. Gütlich, D. W. Ming, F. Renz, T. Wdowiak, S. W. Squyres, R. E. Arvidson
Science; 305 (5685) (2004), 833-836.

[2] Jarosite and Hematite at Meridiani Planum from Opportunity's Mössbauer Spectrometer. G. Klingelhöfer, R. V. Morris, B. Bernhardt, C. Schröder, D. S. Rodionov, P. A. de Souza, A. Yen, R. Gellert, E. N. Evlanov, B. Zubkov, J. Foh, U. Bonnes, E. Kankeleit, P. Gütlich, D. W. Ming, F. Renz, T. Wdowiak, S. W. Squyres, R. E. Arvidson
Science 306 (2004), 1740-1745.

 

Last modified:22 October 2012 2.30 p.m.