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OnderzoekUrban and Regional Studies InstituteResearch projects

The short and long term influence of road pricing on households and firms

Principal researcher

Erica L. Gómez

Type of research

PhD-project

Supervisor(s)

Prof.dr. Henk Folmer

Dr. Taede Tillema

Summary

Road pricing policies are increasingly considered, or even implemented, in urbanized areas around the world with the aim of alleviating the external traffic-related costs. The most visible cost of congestion and the one that worries users the most is the increase in travel time. Into this context, travel time gains are an important benefit component of road pricing and this plays an indisputable role as a strategy to reduce traffic congestion. Road tolls imply charging for the use of (congested) routes, so that the users perceive the social (marginal) cost of traveling and make decisions concerning their travel route, transport means, and timing (see Ortúzar, 2002). Road pricing policies may not only influence short-term behaviour including decisions regarding route and departure time, mode and destination choice, and trip frequencies. In the long run, actors may also decide to make changes in their activity locations. Households could, for example, choose to shop or enjoy recreation elsewhere. In the long term, they may also decide to adapt their residential and/or work locations. This research project aims to measure the influence of road pricing on firms intentions to relocate and to analyse to what extent are geographical accessibility measure outcomes under road pricing conditions sensitive to varying cost (generalized transport cost function) and non-cost related aspects (accessibility measure). Stated preference data, among other information, about short and long term effects of road pricing policy in the Netherlands for households and firms will be used. The factors that influence the relocation probability and other potential consequences it will be identified by means of an ordered probit approach.

Last modified:23 February 2015 3.18 p.m.