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Our present Rosalind Franklin Fellows

Rosalind Franklin Fellowships - Tenure track for promising female academic staff

Lidewijde de Jong

Lidewijde de Jong
Lidewijde de Jong

Dr. Lidewijde de Jong works at the Archaeology Department as a Roman archaeologist. She specializes in the reconstruction of ancient imperialism from the perspective of local communities. Her research concentrates on funerary practices in the Roman Near East, but also covers the impact of Seleucid and Early Islamic rule in North Mesopotamia. She has published widely on these topics, including a monograph with Cambridge University Press on the Archaeology of Death in Roman Syria.

Dr. Lidewijde de Jong received her MA in Archaeology from the University of Amsterdam and her PhD from Stanford University. Before coming to Groningen, She was Assistant Professor at the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill, and a Visiting Fellow at the Institute for the Study of the Ancient world.

Currently, Lidewijde is working on a project examining the assertion of local identities in the globalized Hellenistic and Roman Near East. She also collaborates with ICT specialists on the development of a tool for the digital recording and analyzing of funerary remains. This project Is linked to her involvement in debates about cultural heritage in periods of crisis, in particular in Iraq, Syria, and Palmyra.

She has carried out fieldwork in Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, Tunisia, Greece, and Italy, and at present works in Iraqi Kurdistan and Turkey.

More information: dr. Lidewijde de Jong

Merel Keijzer

Merel Keijzer
Merel Keijzer
Dr. Merel Keijzer works at the department of Applied Linguistics, where she specializes in the language and cognitive control of bilinguals across the lifespan.

She received her PhD in Linguistics from the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam and subsequently took up an Assistant Professor position of English as a Second Language at Delft University of Technology. From 2008 to 2013 she was an Assistant Professor of English Linguistics at Utrecht University, where she also carried out a VENI project on the language dominance shift and associated language and cognitive control among elderly Dutch emigrants in Australia. Just prior to coming to Groningen, she spent a year as visiting professor at the Center for Language Science at the Pennsylvania State University.

In her work, she tries to integrate bilingual language learning and loss as dynamic processes of growth and decline that occur throughout a bilingual's lifespan. Employing both behavioral and neuroimaging techniques, she is especially interested in establishing how individual bilingual experiences (taking into account factors such as age of acquisition, contexts and extent of use, but also intraspeaker variables like available cognitive resources) impact on bilingual language development and the bilingual cognitive advantage that is frequently reported.

More information: dr. Merel Keijzer

Sabrina Corbellini

Sabrina Corbellini
Sabrina Corbellini
Sabrina Corbellini works at the Department of History, where her research focuses on late medieval and early modern history of reading, in particular in Italy and in the Low Countries. After obtaining a degree in Germanic Philology at the University of Bologna (Italy), she received her PhD in Medieval Dutch Literature from the University of Leyden in 2000. Since 2017, she holds a professorship in the “History of Reading in Premodern Europe”.

She specializes in the reconstruction and study of religious reading activities in premodern Europe, in particular during the “long fifteenth century” (1350-1520). She has been PI of the ERC-Starting Grant research project “Holy Writ and Lay Readers. A Social History of Vernacular Bible Translations in Late Medieval Europe” (2008-2013) and has chaired the COST Action “New Communities of Interpretation: Context, Strategies and Process of Religious Transformation in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe” (2013-2017). Since 2015, she coordinates the research project, “Cities of Readers. Religious Literacies in the long Fifteenth Century”, which aims at reconstructing the participation of lay people to the production and the transmission of religious knowledge through the study of their engagement in textual and performative activities. Together with Wim François (University of Louvain, BE) she also since 2017 leads the project “In Readers’ Hands. Early Modern Dutch Bibles from a Users’ Perspective”, which aims at developing new methodological approaches to the reconstruction of the reading activities in Early Modern Europe. She has published extensively on (religious) reading and has edited the volumes Instructing the Soul, Feeding the Spirit and Awakening the Passion. Cultures of Religious Reading in the Late Middle Ages (Turnhout 2013) and Discovering the Riches: Religious Reading in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe. (Brill 2015).

More information: prof. dr Sabrina Corbellini

Tamara Witschge

Tamara Witschge
Tamara Witschge

Dr. Tamara Witschge works at the department of Journalism Studies and Media where her main research objects are media and democracy, changes in the journalistic field, equality and diversity in the public sphere, and the public debate on immigration.

Before she came to Groningen, she was a lecturer at the School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies, Cardiff University from 2009-2012. Before that (2007-2009) she was a research associate at Goldsmiths Leverhulme Media Research Centre and worked on project 'Spaces of News'. This project explored the ways in which technological, economic and social change is reconfiguring news journalism. She has published widely on this topic, and is co-author of the recently published book ‘Changing Journalism’ (2011, Routledge). Her PhD thesis '(In)difference Online' (2007) examined the openness of public debate on contested issues. Tamara is the General Secretary of European Communication Research and Education Association (ECREA) and a member of the editorial board of the international journal ‘New Media and Society’, the newly established journal 'Digital Journalism, ‘Platform: the Journal of Media and Communication,’ and the German edition of the ‘Global Media Journal’.

More information: dr. Tamara Witschge

Last modified:26 February 2019 3.01 p.m.