Publication

Why are some people's names easier to learn than others? The effects of face similarity on memory for face-name associations

Pantelis, P. C., Van Vugt, M. K., Sekuler, R., Wilson, H. R. & Kahana, M. J., 1-Sep-2008, In : Memory & Cognition. 36, 6, p. 1182-1195 14 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

APA

Pantelis, P. C., Van Vugt, M. K., Sekuler, R., Wilson, H. R., & Kahana, M. J. (2008). Why are some people's names easier to learn than others? The effects of face similarity on memory for face-name associations. Memory & Cognition, 36(6), 1182-1195. https://doi.org/10.3758/MC.36.6.1182

Author

Pantelis, Peter C. ; Van Vugt, Marieke K. ; Sekuler, Robert ; Wilson, Hugh R. ; Kahana, Michael J. / Why are some people's names easier to learn than others? The effects of face similarity on memory for face-name associations. In: Memory & Cognition. 2008 ; Vol. 36, No. 6. pp. 1182-1195.

Harvard

Pantelis, PC, Van Vugt, MK, Sekuler, R, Wilson, HR & Kahana, MJ 2008, 'Why are some people's names easier to learn than others? The effects of face similarity on memory for face-name associations' Memory & Cognition, vol. 36, no. 6, pp. 1182-1195. https://doi.org/10.3758/MC.36.6.1182

Standard

Why are some people's names easier to learn than others? The effects of face similarity on memory for face-name associations. / Pantelis, Peter C.; Van Vugt, Marieke K.; Sekuler, Robert; Wilson, Hugh R.; Kahana, Michael J.

In: Memory & Cognition, Vol. 36, No. 6, 01.09.2008, p. 1182-1195.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Vancouver

Pantelis PC, Van Vugt MK, Sekuler R, Wilson HR, Kahana MJ. Why are some people's names easier to learn than others? The effects of face similarity on memory for face-name associations. Memory & Cognition. 2008 Sep 1;36(6):1182-1195. https://doi.org/10.3758/MC.36.6.1182


BibTeX

@article{aa2addb884cc423387f953ef939bf68a,
title = "Why are some people's names easier to learn than others? The effects of face similarity on memory for face-name associations",
abstract = "Using synthetic faces that varied along four perceptual dimensions (Wilson, Loffler, & Wilkinson, 2002), we examined the effects of face similarity on memory for face-name associations. The nature of these stimuli allowed us to go beyond the categorical similarity manipulations used in previous verbal associative memory studies to trace out the parametric relation between similarity and various performance measures. In Experiment 1, we found that recall performance diminished as a function of how many studied faces were in the vicinity of the cue face in similarity space. Also, incorrect recalls were more likely to come from nearby positions in face space. Experiments 2 and 3, respectively, demonstrated analogous effects with a set of more distinguishable, photorealistic faces, and in an associative recognition task. These results highlight the similarity between associative recall and associative recognition, and between face-name association and other domains of associative memory. Copyright 2008 Psychonomic Society, Inc.",
keywords = "article, associative memory, confusion, controlled study, decision making, female, human, human experiment, learning, male, normal human, perception, recall, recognition, stimulation",
author = "Pantelis, {Peter C.} and {Van Vugt}, {Marieke K.} and Robert Sekuler and Wilson, {Hugh R.} and Kahana, {Michael J.}",
year = "2008",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.3758/MC.36.6.1182",
language = "English",
volume = "36",
pages = "1182--1195",
journal = "Memory & Cognition",
issn = "0090-502X",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Why are some people's names easier to learn than others? The effects of face similarity on memory for face-name associations

AU - Pantelis, Peter C.

AU - Van Vugt, Marieke K.

AU - Sekuler, Robert

AU - Wilson, Hugh R.

AU - Kahana, Michael J.

PY - 2008/9/1

Y1 - 2008/9/1

N2 - Using synthetic faces that varied along four perceptual dimensions (Wilson, Loffler, & Wilkinson, 2002), we examined the effects of face similarity on memory for face-name associations. The nature of these stimuli allowed us to go beyond the categorical similarity manipulations used in previous verbal associative memory studies to trace out the parametric relation between similarity and various performance measures. In Experiment 1, we found that recall performance diminished as a function of how many studied faces were in the vicinity of the cue face in similarity space. Also, incorrect recalls were more likely to come from nearby positions in face space. Experiments 2 and 3, respectively, demonstrated analogous effects with a set of more distinguishable, photorealistic faces, and in an associative recognition task. These results highlight the similarity between associative recall and associative recognition, and between face-name association and other domains of associative memory. Copyright 2008 Psychonomic Society, Inc.

AB - Using synthetic faces that varied along four perceptual dimensions (Wilson, Loffler, & Wilkinson, 2002), we examined the effects of face similarity on memory for face-name associations. The nature of these stimuli allowed us to go beyond the categorical similarity manipulations used in previous verbal associative memory studies to trace out the parametric relation between similarity and various performance measures. In Experiment 1, we found that recall performance diminished as a function of how many studied faces were in the vicinity of the cue face in similarity space. Also, incorrect recalls were more likely to come from nearby positions in face space. Experiments 2 and 3, respectively, demonstrated analogous effects with a set of more distinguishable, photorealistic faces, and in an associative recognition task. These results highlight the similarity between associative recall and associative recognition, and between face-name association and other domains of associative memory. Copyright 2008 Psychonomic Society, Inc.

KW - article

KW - associative memory

KW - confusion

KW - controlled study

KW - decision making

KW - female

KW - human

KW - human experiment

KW - learning

KW - male

KW - normal human

KW - perception

KW - recall

KW - recognition

KW - stimulation

U2 - 10.3758/MC.36.6.1182

DO - 10.3758/MC.36.6.1182

M3 - Article

VL - 36

SP - 1182

EP - 1195

JO - Memory & Cognition

JF - Memory & Cognition

SN - 0090-502X

IS - 6

ER -

ID: 13280386