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Weight changes associated with antiepileptic mood stabilizers in the treatment of bipolar disorder

Grootens, K. P., Meijer, A., Hartong, E. G., Doornbos, B., Bakker, P. R., Al Hadithy, A., Hoogerheide, K. N., Overmeire, F., Marijnissen, R. M. & Ruhe, H. G., Nov-2018, In : European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology. 74, 11, p. 1485-1489 5 p.

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  • Weight changes associated with antiepileptic mood stabilizers

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DOI

  • Koen P. Grootens
  • Anna Meijer
  • Erwin G. Hartong
  • Bennard Doornbos
  • P. Roberto Bakker
  • Asmar Al Hadithy
  • Kirsten N. Hoogerheide
  • Frans Overmeire
  • Radboud M. Marijnissen
  • Henricus G. Ruhe

Objective To present up-to-date information and recommendations on the management of body weight changes during the use of antiepileptic mood stabilizers in bipolar disorder to help clinicians and patients make well-informed, practical decisions.

Data sources Umbrella review. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses on the prevention, treatment, and monitoring of body weight changes as a side effect of the mood stabilizers valproate, lamotrigine, topiramate, and carbamazepine were identified in Embase (2010-2015, no language restrictions).

Study selection The search yielded 18 relevant publications on antiepileptic mood stabilizers and weight changes in bipolar disorder.

Data extraction Relevant scientific evidence was abstracted and put into a clinical perspective by a multidisciplinary expert panel of clinicians with expertise in the treatment of bipolar disorders across all age groups and a patient representative.

Results Valproate has been proven to be associated with weight gain in up to 50% of its users, and can be detected 2-3 months after initiation. Carbamazepine has been proven to have a low risk of weight gain. Lamotrigine and topiramate are associated with weight loss. Other option for this sentence = Weigth gain has been proven to be associated with valproate use in up to 50% of its users, and can be detected within 2-3 months after initiation.

Conclusion Each antiepileptic mood stabilizer has specific effects on body weight and accordingly requires a discrete education, prevention, monitoring, and treatment strategy. Clinicians are recommended to adopt an active, anticipatory approach, educating patients about weight change as an important side effect in order to come to informed shared decisions about the most suitable mood stabilizer.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1485-1489
Number of pages5
JournalEuropean Journal of Clinical Pharmacology
Volume74
Issue number11
Publication statusPublished - Nov-2018

    Keywords

  • Bipolar disorder, Weight gain, Weight loss, Anti-obesity agents, Body weight changes, Valproate, Lamotrigine, Topiramate, Carbamazepine, MANAGEMENT, GAIN, MEDICATIONS, TOPIRAMATE, CHILDREN
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  1. Correction to: Weight changes associated with antiepileptic mood stabilizers in the treatment of bipolar disorder

    Grootens, K. P., Meijer, A., Hartong, E. G., Doornbos, B., Bakker, P. R., Al Hadithy, A., Hoogerheide, K. N., Overmeire, F., Marijnissen, R. M. & Ruhe, H. G., Nov-2018, In : European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology. 74, 11, p. 1491-1491 1 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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