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Walking ability to predict future cognitive decline in old adults: A scoping review.

Kikkert, L. H. J., Vuillerme, N., Van Campen, J., Hortobagyi, T. & Lamoth, C. J., May-2016, In : Ageing Research Reviews. 6, 27, p. 1-14 14 p.

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  • Walking ability to predict future cognitive decline in old adults

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DOI

Early identification of individuals at risk for cognitive decline may facilitate the selection of those who benefit most from interventions. Current models predicting cognitive decline include neuropsychological and/or biological markers. Additional markers based on walking ability might improve accuracy and specificity of these models because motor and cognitive functions share neuroanatomical structures and psychological processes. We reviewed the relationship between walking ability at one point of (mid) life and cognitive decline at follow-up. A systematic literature search identified 20 longitudinal studies. The average follow-up time was 4.5 years. Gait speed quantified walking ability in most studies (n = 18). Additional gait measures (n = 4) were step frequency, variability and step-length. Despite methodological weaknesses, results revealed that gait slowing (0.68-1.1 m/sec) preceded cognitive decline and the presence of dementia syndromes (maximal odds and hazard ratios of 10.4 and 11.1, respectively). The results indicate that measures of walking ability could serve as additional markers to predict cognitive decline. However, gait speed alone might lack specificity. We recommend gait analysis, including dynamic gait parameters, in clinical evaluations of patients with suspected cognitive decline. Future studies should focus on examining the specificity and accuracy of various gait characteristics to predict future cognitive decline. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-14
Number of pages14
JournalAgeing Research Reviews
Volume6
Issue number27
Publication statusPublished - May-2016

    Keywords

  • Dementia, Cognitive impairment, Biomarker, Gait, MCI, Prediction models, PRODROMAL ALZHEIMERS-DISEASE, RISK-FACTORS, GAIT SPEED, DUAL-TASK, FOLLOW-UP, EXECUTIVE FUNCTION, GLOBAL PREVALENCE, DELPHI CONSENSUS, BODY-COMPOSITION, ELDERLY PERSONS

ID: 29135895