Publication

Vascular Burden and Cognitive Function in Late-Life Depression

Zuidersma, M., Izaks, G. J., Naarding, P., Comijs, H. C. & Oude Voshaar, R. C., May-2015, In : American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. 23, 5, p. 514-524 11 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

APA

Zuidersma, M., Izaks, G. J., Naarding, P., Comijs, H. C., & Oude Voshaar, R. C. (2015). Vascular Burden and Cognitive Function in Late-Life Depression. American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 23(5), 514-524. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jagp.2014.06.010

Author

Zuidersma, Marij ; Izaks, Gerbrand J. ; Naarding, Paul ; Comijs, Hannie C. ; Oude Voshaar, Richard C. . / Vascular Burden and Cognitive Function in Late-Life Depression. In: American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. 2015 ; Vol. 23, No. 5. pp. 514-524.

Harvard

Zuidersma, M, Izaks, GJ, Naarding, P, Comijs, HC & Oude Voshaar, RC 2015, 'Vascular Burden and Cognitive Function in Late-Life Depression', American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, vol. 23, no. 5, pp. 514-524. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jagp.2014.06.010

Standard

Vascular Burden and Cognitive Function in Late-Life Depression. / Zuidersma, Marij; Izaks, Gerbrand J.; Naarding, Paul; Comijs, Hannie C.; Oude Voshaar, Richard C. .

In: American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Vol. 23, No. 5, 05.2015, p. 514-524.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Vancouver

Zuidersma M, Izaks GJ, Naarding P, Comijs HC, Oude Voshaar RC. Vascular Burden and Cognitive Function in Late-Life Depression. American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. 2015 May;23(5):514-524. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jagp.2014.06.010


BibTeX

@article{0f44f5e98ffc48398b53947d0ed879aa,
title = "Vascular Burden and Cognitive Function in Late-Life Depression",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the relation of vascular risk factors, subclinical, and manifest vascular disease with four domains of cognitive functioning in a large sample of clinically depressed older persons.METHODS: A cross-sectional analysis was used, and depressed patients were recruited from general practices and mental healthcare institutes. Presence of a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, depressive episode was established with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Framingham Risk Score (FRS) was used as a measure for vascular risk profile, ankle-brachial index for subclinical vascular disease, and history of a cardiovascular event as a measure for manifest vascular disease. Three neurocognitive tasks evaluated processing speed, working memory, verbal memory, and interference control.RESULTS: In 378 participants, linear regression analysis showed that FRS was related to poorer interference control (t = -2.353; df = 377; p <0.05) but to no other cognitive domain after adjustment for age, sex, education level, and depressive symptom severity. Lower ankle-brachial index and history of cardiovascular event were related to slower processing speed (t = 2.659; df = 377; p <0.05 and t = -3.328; df = 377; p <0.01, respectively) but to no other cognitive domain. In 267 participants without manifest vascular disease, higher FRS was related to slower processing speed (t = -2.425; df = 266; p <0.05) and poorer interference control (t = -2.423; df = 266; p <0.05), and lower ankle brachial index was related to slower processing speed (t = 2.171; df = 266; p <0.05).CONCLUSION: In depressed older persons, vascular burden is related to slower processing speed also in the absence of manifest vascular disease. Poorer interference control was only related to vascular risk factors but not to subclinical or manifest vascular disease.",
keywords = "Vascular risk factors, vascular disease, depression, cognitive functioning, CEREBROVASCULAR RISK-FACTORS, MYOCARDIAL-INFARCTION, ATHEROSCLEROSIS RISK, OLD-AGE, DISEASE, SYMPTOMS, DEMENTIA, INTERFERENCE, ASSOCIATION, IMPAIRMENT",
author = "Marij Zuidersma and Izaks, {Gerbrand J.} and Paul Naarding and Comijs, {Hannie C.} and {Oude Voshaar}, {Richard C.}",
note = "Copyright {\textcopyright} 2014 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.",
year = "2015",
month = may,
doi = "10.1016/j.jagp.2014.06.010",
language = "English",
volume = "23",
pages = "514--524",
journal = "American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry",
issn = "1064-7481",
publisher = "ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Vascular Burden and Cognitive Function in Late-Life Depression

AU - Zuidersma, Marij

AU - Izaks, Gerbrand J.

AU - Naarding, Paul

AU - Comijs, Hannie C.

AU - Oude Voshaar, Richard C.

N1 - Copyright © 2014 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PY - 2015/5

Y1 - 2015/5

N2 - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the relation of vascular risk factors, subclinical, and manifest vascular disease with four domains of cognitive functioning in a large sample of clinically depressed older persons.METHODS: A cross-sectional analysis was used, and depressed patients were recruited from general practices and mental healthcare institutes. Presence of a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, depressive episode was established with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Framingham Risk Score (FRS) was used as a measure for vascular risk profile, ankle-brachial index for subclinical vascular disease, and history of a cardiovascular event as a measure for manifest vascular disease. Three neurocognitive tasks evaluated processing speed, working memory, verbal memory, and interference control.RESULTS: In 378 participants, linear regression analysis showed that FRS was related to poorer interference control (t = -2.353; df = 377; p <0.05) but to no other cognitive domain after adjustment for age, sex, education level, and depressive symptom severity. Lower ankle-brachial index and history of cardiovascular event were related to slower processing speed (t = 2.659; df = 377; p <0.05 and t = -3.328; df = 377; p <0.01, respectively) but to no other cognitive domain. In 267 participants without manifest vascular disease, higher FRS was related to slower processing speed (t = -2.425; df = 266; p <0.05) and poorer interference control (t = -2.423; df = 266; p <0.05), and lower ankle brachial index was related to slower processing speed (t = 2.171; df = 266; p <0.05).CONCLUSION: In depressed older persons, vascular burden is related to slower processing speed also in the absence of manifest vascular disease. Poorer interference control was only related to vascular risk factors but not to subclinical or manifest vascular disease.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the relation of vascular risk factors, subclinical, and manifest vascular disease with four domains of cognitive functioning in a large sample of clinically depressed older persons.METHODS: A cross-sectional analysis was used, and depressed patients were recruited from general practices and mental healthcare institutes. Presence of a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, depressive episode was established with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Framingham Risk Score (FRS) was used as a measure for vascular risk profile, ankle-brachial index for subclinical vascular disease, and history of a cardiovascular event as a measure for manifest vascular disease. Three neurocognitive tasks evaluated processing speed, working memory, verbal memory, and interference control.RESULTS: In 378 participants, linear regression analysis showed that FRS was related to poorer interference control (t = -2.353; df = 377; p <0.05) but to no other cognitive domain after adjustment for age, sex, education level, and depressive symptom severity. Lower ankle-brachial index and history of cardiovascular event were related to slower processing speed (t = 2.659; df = 377; p <0.05 and t = -3.328; df = 377; p <0.01, respectively) but to no other cognitive domain. In 267 participants without manifest vascular disease, higher FRS was related to slower processing speed (t = -2.425; df = 266; p <0.05) and poorer interference control (t = -2.423; df = 266; p <0.05), and lower ankle brachial index was related to slower processing speed (t = 2.171; df = 266; p <0.05).CONCLUSION: In depressed older persons, vascular burden is related to slower processing speed also in the absence of manifest vascular disease. Poorer interference control was only related to vascular risk factors but not to subclinical or manifest vascular disease.

KW - Vascular risk factors

KW - vascular disease

KW - depression

KW - cognitive functioning

KW - CEREBROVASCULAR RISK-FACTORS

KW - MYOCARDIAL-INFARCTION

KW - ATHEROSCLEROSIS RISK

KW - OLD-AGE

KW - DISEASE

KW - SYMPTOMS

KW - DEMENTIA

KW - INTERFERENCE

KW - ASSOCIATION

KW - IMPAIRMENT

U2 - 10.1016/j.jagp.2014.06.010

DO - 10.1016/j.jagp.2014.06.010

M3 - Article

C2 - 25091518

VL - 23

SP - 514

EP - 524

JO - American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry

JF - American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry

SN - 1064-7481

IS - 5

ER -

ID: 16280914