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Vascular Burden and Cognitive Function in Late-Life Depression

Zuidersma, M., Izaks, G. J., Naarding, P., Comijs, H. C. & Oude Voshaar, R. C., May-2015, In : American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. 23, 5, p. 514-524 11 p.

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  • Vascular Burden and Cognitive Function in Late-Life Depression

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OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the relation of vascular risk factors, subclinical, and manifest vascular disease with four domains of cognitive functioning in a large sample of clinically depressed older persons.

METHODS: A cross-sectional analysis was used, and depressed patients were recruited from general practices and mental healthcare institutes. Presence of a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, depressive episode was established with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Framingham Risk Score (FRS) was used as a measure for vascular risk profile, ankle-brachial index for subclinical vascular disease, and history of a cardiovascular event as a measure for manifest vascular disease. Three neurocognitive tasks evaluated processing speed, working memory, verbal memory, and interference control.

RESULTS: In 378 participants, linear regression analysis showed that FRS was related to poorer interference control (t = -2.353; df = 377; p <0.05) but to no other cognitive domain after adjustment for age, sex, education level, and depressive symptom severity. Lower ankle-brachial index and history of cardiovascular event were related to slower processing speed (t = 2.659; df = 377; p <0.05 and t = -3.328; df = 377; p <0.01, respectively) but to no other cognitive domain. In 267 participants without manifest vascular disease, higher FRS was related to slower processing speed (t = -2.425; df = 266; p <0.05) and poorer interference control (t = -2.423; df = 266; p <0.05), and lower ankle brachial index was related to slower processing speed (t = 2.171; df = 266; p <0.05).

CONCLUSION: In depressed older persons, vascular burden is related to slower processing speed also in the absence of manifest vascular disease. Poorer interference control was only related to vascular risk factors but not to subclinical or manifest vascular disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)514-524
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Volume23
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - May-2015

    Keywords

  • Vascular risk factors, vascular disease, depression, cognitive functioning, CEREBROVASCULAR RISK-FACTORS, MYOCARDIAL-INFARCTION, ATHEROSCLEROSIS RISK, OLD-AGE, DISEASE, SYMPTOMS, DEMENTIA, INTERFERENCE, ASSOCIATION, IMPAIRMENT

ID: 16280914