Publication

Use of cleaning agents at home and respiratory and allergic symptoms in adolescents: The PIAMA birth cohort study

Bukalasa, J. S., Brunekreef, B., Koppelman, G. H., Vonk, J. M. & Gehring, U., Jul-2019, In : Environment international. 128, p. 63-69 7 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

APA

Bukalasa, J. S., Brunekreef, B., Koppelman, G. H., Vonk, J. M., & Gehring, U. (2019). Use of cleaning agents at home and respiratory and allergic symptoms in adolescents: The PIAMA birth cohort study. Environment international, 128, 63-69. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2019.03.049

Author

Bukalasa, Joseph S ; Brunekreef, Bert ; Koppelman, Gerard H ; Vonk, Judith M ; Gehring, Ulrike. / Use of cleaning agents at home and respiratory and allergic symptoms in adolescents : The PIAMA birth cohort study. In: Environment international. 2019 ; Vol. 128. pp. 63-69.

Harvard

Bukalasa, JS, Brunekreef, B, Koppelman, GH, Vonk, JM & Gehring, U 2019, 'Use of cleaning agents at home and respiratory and allergic symptoms in adolescents: The PIAMA birth cohort study', Environment international, vol. 128, pp. 63-69. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2019.03.049

Standard

Use of cleaning agents at home and respiratory and allergic symptoms in adolescents : The PIAMA birth cohort study. / Bukalasa, Joseph S; Brunekreef, Bert; Koppelman, Gerard H; Vonk, Judith M; Gehring, Ulrike.

In: Environment international, Vol. 128, 07.2019, p. 63-69.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Vancouver

Bukalasa JS, Brunekreef B, Koppelman GH, Vonk JM, Gehring U. Use of cleaning agents at home and respiratory and allergic symptoms in adolescents: The PIAMA birth cohort study. Environment international. 2019 Jul;128:63-69. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2019.03.049


BibTeX

@article{292d4089d5d144eca0dce00277eecaeb,
title = "Use of cleaning agents at home and respiratory and allergic symptoms in adolescents: The PIAMA birth cohort study",
abstract = "Background: It has been suggested that adults who use cleaning agents in their homes have a higher risk of asthma and allergic symptoms. The associations of asthma and allergic symptoms with household use of cleaning agents in adolescents have not been investigated yet.Objectives: To examine the associations of household cleaning agents use with the prevalence of asthma, rhinitis and eczema in adolescents.Methods: In this cross-sectional analysis, we included participants of the PIAMA birth cohort study with data on household use of 10 types of cleaning agents and information on asthma, rhinitis and/or eczema from parent-completed questionnaires at age 14 (N = 2333). For the cleaning agents, we developed a composite score ranging from 0 (no exposure) to 30 points (household use on 4-7 days per week for all 10 types of cleaning agents). Logistic regression was used to analyse associations between household cleaning agents use (composite score and specific cleaning agents) and outcomes, adjusting for potential confounders.Results: Seven, 13 and 11{\%} of the participants had asthma, rhinitis and eczema, respectively, at age 14. The composite score for household use of cleaning agents was not associated with asthma, rhinitis and eczema. For instance, adjusted odds ratios (95{\%} confidence interval) for the prevalence of asthma, rhinitis and eczema comparing those with the highest use of cleaning agents (>= 10 points) to those with never/seldom use (0-4 points) were 0.95 (0.56, 1.63), 1.23 (0.82, 1.82) and 0.95 (0.56, 1.63), respectively. For individual cleaning agents, we only found the use of ammonia to be significantly associated with a lower risk of rhinitis [0.60, (0.44, 0.82)].Conclusions: There was no indication of an increased prevalence of asthma, rhinitis or eczema among adolescents living in households within the highest category of cleaning agents use.",
keywords = "Cleaning agents, Asthma, Rhinitis, Eczema, Birth cohort, Adolescence, FREQUENT USE, AIR-POLLUTION, LUNG-FUNCTION, ASTHMA, PRODUCTS, EXPOSURE, BLEACH, SPRAYS, ASSOCIATION, CHILDHOOD",
author = "Bukalasa, {Joseph S} and Bert Brunekreef and Koppelman, {Gerard H} and Vonk, {Judith M} and Ulrike Gehring",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.",
year = "2019",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1016/j.envint.2019.03.049",
language = "English",
volume = "128",
pages = "63--69",
journal = "Environment international",
issn = "0160-4120",
publisher = "PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Use of cleaning agents at home and respiratory and allergic symptoms in adolescents

T2 - The PIAMA birth cohort study

AU - Bukalasa, Joseph S

AU - Brunekreef, Bert

AU - Koppelman, Gerard H

AU - Vonk, Judith M

AU - Gehring, Ulrike

N1 - Copyright © 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

PY - 2019/7

Y1 - 2019/7

N2 - Background: It has been suggested that adults who use cleaning agents in their homes have a higher risk of asthma and allergic symptoms. The associations of asthma and allergic symptoms with household use of cleaning agents in adolescents have not been investigated yet.Objectives: To examine the associations of household cleaning agents use with the prevalence of asthma, rhinitis and eczema in adolescents.Methods: In this cross-sectional analysis, we included participants of the PIAMA birth cohort study with data on household use of 10 types of cleaning agents and information on asthma, rhinitis and/or eczema from parent-completed questionnaires at age 14 (N = 2333). For the cleaning agents, we developed a composite score ranging from 0 (no exposure) to 30 points (household use on 4-7 days per week for all 10 types of cleaning agents). Logistic regression was used to analyse associations between household cleaning agents use (composite score and specific cleaning agents) and outcomes, adjusting for potential confounders.Results: Seven, 13 and 11% of the participants had asthma, rhinitis and eczema, respectively, at age 14. The composite score for household use of cleaning agents was not associated with asthma, rhinitis and eczema. For instance, adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval) for the prevalence of asthma, rhinitis and eczema comparing those with the highest use of cleaning agents (>= 10 points) to those with never/seldom use (0-4 points) were 0.95 (0.56, 1.63), 1.23 (0.82, 1.82) and 0.95 (0.56, 1.63), respectively. For individual cleaning agents, we only found the use of ammonia to be significantly associated with a lower risk of rhinitis [0.60, (0.44, 0.82)].Conclusions: There was no indication of an increased prevalence of asthma, rhinitis or eczema among adolescents living in households within the highest category of cleaning agents use.

AB - Background: It has been suggested that adults who use cleaning agents in their homes have a higher risk of asthma and allergic symptoms. The associations of asthma and allergic symptoms with household use of cleaning agents in adolescents have not been investigated yet.Objectives: To examine the associations of household cleaning agents use with the prevalence of asthma, rhinitis and eczema in adolescents.Methods: In this cross-sectional analysis, we included participants of the PIAMA birth cohort study with data on household use of 10 types of cleaning agents and information on asthma, rhinitis and/or eczema from parent-completed questionnaires at age 14 (N = 2333). For the cleaning agents, we developed a composite score ranging from 0 (no exposure) to 30 points (household use on 4-7 days per week for all 10 types of cleaning agents). Logistic regression was used to analyse associations between household cleaning agents use (composite score and specific cleaning agents) and outcomes, adjusting for potential confounders.Results: Seven, 13 and 11% of the participants had asthma, rhinitis and eczema, respectively, at age 14. The composite score for household use of cleaning agents was not associated with asthma, rhinitis and eczema. For instance, adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval) for the prevalence of asthma, rhinitis and eczema comparing those with the highest use of cleaning agents (>= 10 points) to those with never/seldom use (0-4 points) were 0.95 (0.56, 1.63), 1.23 (0.82, 1.82) and 0.95 (0.56, 1.63), respectively. For individual cleaning agents, we only found the use of ammonia to be significantly associated with a lower risk of rhinitis [0.60, (0.44, 0.82)].Conclusions: There was no indication of an increased prevalence of asthma, rhinitis or eczema among adolescents living in households within the highest category of cleaning agents use.

KW - Cleaning agents

KW - Asthma

KW - Rhinitis

KW - Eczema

KW - Birth cohort

KW - Adolescence

KW - FREQUENT USE

KW - AIR-POLLUTION

KW - LUNG-FUNCTION

KW - ASTHMA

KW - PRODUCTS

KW - EXPOSURE

KW - BLEACH

KW - SPRAYS

KW - ASSOCIATION

KW - CHILDHOOD

U2 - 10.1016/j.envint.2019.03.049

DO - 10.1016/j.envint.2019.03.049

M3 - Article

VL - 128

SP - 63

EP - 69

JO - Environment international

JF - Environment international

SN - 0160-4120

ER -

ID: 81453217