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The Sec translocase

du Plessis, D. J. F., Nouwen, N. & Driessen, A. J. M., Mar-2011, In : Biochimica et Biophysica Acta-Biomembranes. 1808, 3, p. 851-865 15 p.

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  • The Sec translocase

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DOI

The vast majority of proteins trafficking across or into the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane occur via the translocon. The translocon consists of the SecYEG complex that forms an evolutionarily conserved heterotrimeric protein-conducting membrane channel that functions in conjunction with a variety of ancillary proteins. For posttranslational protein translocation, the translocon interacts with the cytosolic motor protein SecA that drives the ATP-dependent stepwise translocation of unfolded polypeptides across the membrane. For the cotranslational integration of membrane proteins, the translocon interacts with ribosome-nascent chain complexes and membrane insertion is coupled to polypeptide chain elongation at the ribosome. These processes are assisted by the YidC and SecDF(yajC) complex that transiently interacts with the translocon. This review summarizes our current understanding of the structure-function relationship of the translocon and its interactions with ancillary components during protein translocation and membrane protein insertion. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Protein translocation across or insertion into membranes. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)851-865
Number of pages15
JournalBiochimica et Biophysica Acta-Biomembranes
Volume1808
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Mar-2011

    Keywords

  • SecA, SecYEG, YidC, Secretion, Membrane protein, SIGNAL-RECOGNITION PARTICLE, PROTEIN-CONDUCTING CHANNEL, COLI INNER MEMBRANE, PROTON MOTIVE FORCE, BACTERIAL CYTOPLASMIC MEMBRANE, POSITIVELY CHARGED RESIDUES, ENDOPLASMIC-RETICULUM MEMBRANE, LARGE CONFORMATIONAL-CHANGE, BACILLUS-SUBTILIS SECA, IN-VITRO TRANSLOCATION

ID: 5289299