Publication

The metabolic effects of olanzapine and topiramate in rats and humans

Evers, S. S., van Dijk, G., van Vliet, A. & Scheurink, A. J. W., Jul-2011, In : Appetite. 57, Supplement 1, p. S15 1 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting AbstractAcademic

APA

Evers, S. S., van Dijk, G., van Vliet, A., & Scheurink, A. J. W. (2011). The metabolic effects of olanzapine and topiramate in rats and humans. Appetite, 57(Supplement 1), S15.

Author

Evers, S.S. ; van Dijk, G. ; van Vliet, A. ; Scheurink, A.J.W. / The metabolic effects of olanzapine and topiramate in rats and humans. In: Appetite. 2011 ; Vol. 57, No. Supplement 1. pp. S15.

Harvard

Evers, SS, van Dijk, G, van Vliet, A & Scheurink, AJW 2011, 'The metabolic effects of olanzapine and topiramate in rats and humans', Appetite, vol. 57, no. Supplement 1, pp. S15.

Standard

The metabolic effects of olanzapine and topiramate in rats and humans. / Evers, S.S.; van Dijk, G.; van Vliet, A.; Scheurink, A.J.W.

In: Appetite, Vol. 57, No. Supplement 1, 07.2011, p. S15.

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting AbstractAcademic

Vancouver

Evers SS, van Dijk G, van Vliet A, Scheurink AJW. The metabolic effects of olanzapine and topiramate in rats and humans. Appetite. 2011 Jul;57(Supplement 1):S15.


BibTeX

@article{ab3fdcd37d9b42a5ac4faa04a94e65dc,
title = "The metabolic effects of olanzapine and topiramate in rats and humans",
abstract = "In humans the anti-psychotic Olanzapine (OLZ) has negative side effects on metabolism: it causes weight gain and increases the risk of developing type 2 Diabetes. The anti-convulsant Topiramate (TPM) has the opposite effects: it reduces body weight and improves insulin sensitivity. Because of this, it has been proposedto use TPM to counteract OLZs side effects. The underlying mechanisms by which OLZ and TPM influence metabolism are unknown. To study this, we performed a series of studies in bothrats and humans. In rats we administered OLZ and TPM via a permanent intragastric cannula, to mimic oral drug administration, and found that chronic OLZ treatment stimulates weight gain and causes insulin resistance reflected by increased insulin responses during an intravenous-glucose tolerance test OLZ alsodecreased locomotor activity and core temperature, pointing to a reduction in energy expenditure. OLZ also increased weight gainin humans, accompanied with decreased daily physical activity, reduced body temperature and increased baseline and glucosestimulatedinsulin levels during an oral glucose tolerance test. TPM reduced the OLZ-induced overeating and weight gain in both rats and humans combined with an increased postprandial satiety rating (in humans). We conclude that, in both rats and humans, a reduction in energy expenditure may explain, at least in part, theOLZ effects on weight gain and that the OLZ-induced effects on insulin resistance has a peripheral side of action. We also concludethat TPM may prevent the negative metabolic side effects induced by OLZ. Supported by: Top Institute Pharma.",
author = "S.S. Evers and {van Dijk}, G. and {van Vliet}, A. and A.J.W. Scheurink",
note = "Relation: https://www.rug.nl/fwn/onderzoek/programmas/cbn/index Rights: University of Groningen, Centre for Behaviour and Neurosciences; 19th Annual Meeting of the Society for the Study of Ingestive Behavior (SSIB), Clearwater, Florida, USA ; Conference date: 12-07-2011 Through 16-07-2011",
year = "2011",
month = jul,
language = "English",
volume = "57",
pages = "S15",
journal = "Appetite",
issn = "0195-6663",
publisher = "ACADEMIC PRESS LTD- ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD",
number = "Supplement 1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The metabolic effects of olanzapine and topiramate in rats and humans

AU - Evers, S.S.

AU - van Dijk, G.

AU - van Vliet, A.

AU - Scheurink, A.J.W.

N1 - Relation: https://www.rug.nl/fwn/onderzoek/programmas/cbn/index Rights: University of Groningen, Centre for Behaviour and Neurosciences

PY - 2011/7

Y1 - 2011/7

N2 - In humans the anti-psychotic Olanzapine (OLZ) has negative side effects on metabolism: it causes weight gain and increases the risk of developing type 2 Diabetes. The anti-convulsant Topiramate (TPM) has the opposite effects: it reduces body weight and improves insulin sensitivity. Because of this, it has been proposedto use TPM to counteract OLZs side effects. The underlying mechanisms by which OLZ and TPM influence metabolism are unknown. To study this, we performed a series of studies in bothrats and humans. In rats we administered OLZ and TPM via a permanent intragastric cannula, to mimic oral drug administration, and found that chronic OLZ treatment stimulates weight gain and causes insulin resistance reflected by increased insulin responses during an intravenous-glucose tolerance test OLZ alsodecreased locomotor activity and core temperature, pointing to a reduction in energy expenditure. OLZ also increased weight gainin humans, accompanied with decreased daily physical activity, reduced body temperature and increased baseline and glucosestimulatedinsulin levels during an oral glucose tolerance test. TPM reduced the OLZ-induced overeating and weight gain in both rats and humans combined with an increased postprandial satiety rating (in humans). We conclude that, in both rats and humans, a reduction in energy expenditure may explain, at least in part, theOLZ effects on weight gain and that the OLZ-induced effects on insulin resistance has a peripheral side of action. We also concludethat TPM may prevent the negative metabolic side effects induced by OLZ. Supported by: Top Institute Pharma.

AB - In humans the anti-psychotic Olanzapine (OLZ) has negative side effects on metabolism: it causes weight gain and increases the risk of developing type 2 Diabetes. The anti-convulsant Topiramate (TPM) has the opposite effects: it reduces body weight and improves insulin sensitivity. Because of this, it has been proposedto use TPM to counteract OLZs side effects. The underlying mechanisms by which OLZ and TPM influence metabolism are unknown. To study this, we performed a series of studies in bothrats and humans. In rats we administered OLZ and TPM via a permanent intragastric cannula, to mimic oral drug administration, and found that chronic OLZ treatment stimulates weight gain and causes insulin resistance reflected by increased insulin responses during an intravenous-glucose tolerance test OLZ alsodecreased locomotor activity and core temperature, pointing to a reduction in energy expenditure. OLZ also increased weight gainin humans, accompanied with decreased daily physical activity, reduced body temperature and increased baseline and glucosestimulatedinsulin levels during an oral glucose tolerance test. TPM reduced the OLZ-induced overeating and weight gain in both rats and humans combined with an increased postprandial satiety rating (in humans). We conclude that, in both rats and humans, a reduction in energy expenditure may explain, at least in part, theOLZ effects on weight gain and that the OLZ-induced effects on insulin resistance has a peripheral side of action. We also concludethat TPM may prevent the negative metabolic side effects induced by OLZ. Supported by: Top Institute Pharma.

M3 - Meeting Abstract

VL - 57

SP - S15

JO - Appetite

JF - Appetite

SN - 0195-6663

IS - Supplement 1

T2 - 19th Annual Meeting of the Society for the Study of Ingestive Behavior (SSIB), Clearwater, Florida, USA

Y2 - 12 July 2011 through 16 July 2011

ER -

ID: 38603569