Publication

The influence of music on mental effort and driving performance

Ünal, A. B., Steg, L. & Epstude, K., Sep-2012, In : Accident Analysis and Prevention. 48, p. 271-278 8 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

APA

Ünal, A. B., Steg, L., & Epstude, K. (2012). The influence of music on mental effort and driving performance. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 48, 271-278. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aap.2012.01.022

Author

Ünal, Ayca Berfu ; Steg, Linda ; Epstude, Kai. / The influence of music on mental effort and driving performance. In: Accident Analysis and Prevention. 2012 ; Vol. 48. pp. 271-278.

Harvard

Ünal, AB, Steg, L & Epstude, K 2012, 'The influence of music on mental effort and driving performance', Accident Analysis and Prevention, vol. 48, pp. 271-278. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aap.2012.01.022

Standard

The influence of music on mental effort and driving performance. / Ünal, Ayca Berfu; Steg, Linda; Epstude, Kai.

In: Accident Analysis and Prevention, Vol. 48, 09.2012, p. 271-278.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Vancouver

Ünal AB, Steg L, Epstude K. The influence of music on mental effort and driving performance. Accident Analysis and Prevention. 2012 Sep;48:271-278. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aap.2012.01.022


BibTeX

@article{4ad0a8646b2c47c08cdad65db8552c8e,
title = "The influence of music on mental effort and driving performance",
abstract = "The current research examined the influence of loud music on driving performance, and whether mental effort mediated this effect. Participants (N = 69) drove in a driving simulator either with or without listening to music. In order to test whether music would have similar effects on driving performance in different situations, we manipulated the simulated traffic environment such that the driving context consisted of both complex and monotonous driving situations. In addition, we systematically kept track of drivers' mental load by making the participants verbally report their mental effort at certain moments while driving. We found that listening to music increased mental effort while driving, irrespective of the driving situation being complex or monotonous, providing support to the general assumption that music can be a distracting auditory stimulus while driving. However, drivers who listened to music performed as well as the drivers who did not listen to music, indicating that music did not impair their driving performance. Importantly, the increases in mental effort while listening to music pointed out that drivers try to regulate their mental effort as a cognitive compensatory strategy to deal with task demands. Interestingly, we observed significant improvements in driving performance in two of the driving situations. It seems like mental effort might mediate the effect of music on driving performance in situations requiring sustained attention. Other process variables, such as arousal and boredom, should also be incorporated to study designs in order to reveal more on the nature of how music affects driving. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.",
keywords = "Music, Mental effort, Driving performance, Cognitive compensatory strategies, DRIVER DISTRACTION, ATTENTION, WORKLOAD, SPEED, TASKS",
author = "{\"U}nal, {Ayca Berfu} and Linda Steg and Kai Epstude",
year = "2012",
month = sep,
doi = "10.1016/j.aap.2012.01.022",
language = "English",
volume = "48",
pages = "271--278",
journal = "Accident Analysis and Prevention",
issn = "0001-4575",
publisher = "PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The influence of music on mental effort and driving performance

AU - Ünal, Ayca Berfu

AU - Steg, Linda

AU - Epstude, Kai

PY - 2012/9

Y1 - 2012/9

N2 - The current research examined the influence of loud music on driving performance, and whether mental effort mediated this effect. Participants (N = 69) drove in a driving simulator either with or without listening to music. In order to test whether music would have similar effects on driving performance in different situations, we manipulated the simulated traffic environment such that the driving context consisted of both complex and monotonous driving situations. In addition, we systematically kept track of drivers' mental load by making the participants verbally report their mental effort at certain moments while driving. We found that listening to music increased mental effort while driving, irrespective of the driving situation being complex or monotonous, providing support to the general assumption that music can be a distracting auditory stimulus while driving. However, drivers who listened to music performed as well as the drivers who did not listen to music, indicating that music did not impair their driving performance. Importantly, the increases in mental effort while listening to music pointed out that drivers try to regulate their mental effort as a cognitive compensatory strategy to deal with task demands. Interestingly, we observed significant improvements in driving performance in two of the driving situations. It seems like mental effort might mediate the effect of music on driving performance in situations requiring sustained attention. Other process variables, such as arousal and boredom, should also be incorporated to study designs in order to reveal more on the nature of how music affects driving. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

AB - The current research examined the influence of loud music on driving performance, and whether mental effort mediated this effect. Participants (N = 69) drove in a driving simulator either with or without listening to music. In order to test whether music would have similar effects on driving performance in different situations, we manipulated the simulated traffic environment such that the driving context consisted of both complex and monotonous driving situations. In addition, we systematically kept track of drivers' mental load by making the participants verbally report their mental effort at certain moments while driving. We found that listening to music increased mental effort while driving, irrespective of the driving situation being complex or monotonous, providing support to the general assumption that music can be a distracting auditory stimulus while driving. However, drivers who listened to music performed as well as the drivers who did not listen to music, indicating that music did not impair their driving performance. Importantly, the increases in mental effort while listening to music pointed out that drivers try to regulate their mental effort as a cognitive compensatory strategy to deal with task demands. Interestingly, we observed significant improvements in driving performance in two of the driving situations. It seems like mental effort might mediate the effect of music on driving performance in situations requiring sustained attention. Other process variables, such as arousal and boredom, should also be incorporated to study designs in order to reveal more on the nature of how music affects driving. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

KW - Music

KW - Mental effort

KW - Driving performance

KW - Cognitive compensatory strategies

KW - DRIVER DISTRACTION

KW - ATTENTION

KW - WORKLOAD

KW - SPEED

KW - TASKS

U2 - 10.1016/j.aap.2012.01.022

DO - 10.1016/j.aap.2012.01.022

M3 - Article

VL - 48

SP - 271

EP - 278

JO - Accident Analysis and Prevention

JF - Accident Analysis and Prevention

SN - 0001-4575

ER -

ID: 5628033