Publication

The Influence of Caffeine on Sustained Attention: An ERP study

Lorist, MM., Snel, J., De Ruiter, MB. & Ruijter, J., May-2000, In : Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior. 66, 1, p. 29-37 9 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

APA

Lorist, MM., Snel, J., De Ruiter, MB., & Ruijter, J. (2000). The Influence of Caffeine on Sustained Attention: An ERP study. Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, 66(1), 29-37.

Author

Lorist, MM ; Snel, J ; De Ruiter, MB ; Ruijter, J. / The Influence of Caffeine on Sustained Attention: An ERP study. In: Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior. 2000 ; Vol. 66, No. 1. pp. 29-37.

Harvard

Lorist, MM, Snel, J, De Ruiter, MB & Ruijter, J 2000, 'The Influence of Caffeine on Sustained Attention: An ERP study', Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, vol. 66, no. 1, pp. 29-37.

Standard

The Influence of Caffeine on Sustained Attention: An ERP study. / Lorist, MM; Snel, J; De Ruiter, MB; Ruijter, J.

In: Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, Vol. 66, No. 1, 05.2000, p. 29-37.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Vancouver

Lorist MM, Snel J, De Ruiter MB, Ruijter J. The Influence of Caffeine on Sustained Attention: An ERP study. Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior. 2000 May;66(1):29-37.


BibTeX

@article{f98434a2114c4a1391087bcb63f210b8,
title = "The Influence of Caffeine on Sustained Attention: An ERP study",
abstract = "The present study investigated the effects of caffeine on sustained attention by measuring concentration and fatigue. Event-related potentials (ERPs) and behavioral measures were recorded from 12 participants who worked continuously for approximately 10 min in a self-paced reaction task under conditions of both caffeine (250 mg) and placebo. The ERP data revealed more positive frontal P2 and parietal P3 components in the caffeine condition. However, a combination of different indices of the behavioral data did not reveal any effects of caffeine intake. These results suggest that caffeine increases arousal, thereby reducing fatigue, as was observed in the ERP results. A probable explanation for the absence of any effects of caffeine in the behavioral data can be found in the demanding properties of the task that was used, thereby supporting evidence for more pronounced effects of caffeine in suboptimal conditions. In addition, these results appeal for an increase in the use of ERPs in drug research, in order to discover possible effects on the brain which do not necessarily result in behavioral changes. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Inc.",
keywords = "caffeine, ERP, sustained attention, lapses of attention, concentration, fatigue, Bourdon task, SELECTIVE ATTENTION, FATIGUED SUBJECTS, VISUAL VIGILANCE, PERFORMANCE, P300, POTENTIALS, MEMORY, TASK, EEG",
author = "MM Lorist and J Snel and {De Ruiter}, MB and J Ruijter",
year = "2000",
month = "5",
language = "English",
volume = "66",
pages = "29--37",
journal = "Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior",
issn = "0091-3057",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Influence of Caffeine on Sustained Attention: An ERP study

AU - Lorist, MM

AU - Snel, J

AU - De Ruiter, MB

AU - Ruijter, J

PY - 2000/5

Y1 - 2000/5

N2 - The present study investigated the effects of caffeine on sustained attention by measuring concentration and fatigue. Event-related potentials (ERPs) and behavioral measures were recorded from 12 participants who worked continuously for approximately 10 min in a self-paced reaction task under conditions of both caffeine (250 mg) and placebo. The ERP data revealed more positive frontal P2 and parietal P3 components in the caffeine condition. However, a combination of different indices of the behavioral data did not reveal any effects of caffeine intake. These results suggest that caffeine increases arousal, thereby reducing fatigue, as was observed in the ERP results. A probable explanation for the absence of any effects of caffeine in the behavioral data can be found in the demanding properties of the task that was used, thereby supporting evidence for more pronounced effects of caffeine in suboptimal conditions. In addition, these results appeal for an increase in the use of ERPs in drug research, in order to discover possible effects on the brain which do not necessarily result in behavioral changes. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Inc.

AB - The present study investigated the effects of caffeine on sustained attention by measuring concentration and fatigue. Event-related potentials (ERPs) and behavioral measures were recorded from 12 participants who worked continuously for approximately 10 min in a self-paced reaction task under conditions of both caffeine (250 mg) and placebo. The ERP data revealed more positive frontal P2 and parietal P3 components in the caffeine condition. However, a combination of different indices of the behavioral data did not reveal any effects of caffeine intake. These results suggest that caffeine increases arousal, thereby reducing fatigue, as was observed in the ERP results. A probable explanation for the absence of any effects of caffeine in the behavioral data can be found in the demanding properties of the task that was used, thereby supporting evidence for more pronounced effects of caffeine in suboptimal conditions. In addition, these results appeal for an increase in the use of ERPs in drug research, in order to discover possible effects on the brain which do not necessarily result in behavioral changes. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Inc.

KW - caffeine

KW - ERP

KW - sustained attention

KW - lapses of attention

KW - concentration

KW - fatigue

KW - Bourdon task

KW - SELECTIVE ATTENTION

KW - FATIGUED SUBJECTS

KW - VISUAL VIGILANCE

KW - PERFORMANCE

KW - P300

KW - POTENTIALS

KW - MEMORY

KW - TASK

KW - EEG

M3 - Article

VL - 66

SP - 29

EP - 37

JO - Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior

JF - Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior

SN - 0091-3057

IS - 1

ER -

ID: 705399