Publication

Taxi drivers with a PhD: trickle down or crowding-out for lower educated workers in Dutch cities?

Ponds, R., Marlet, G., van Woerkens, C. & Garretsen, H., Jul-2016, In : Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society. 9, 2, p. 405-422 18 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

APA

Ponds, R., Marlet, G., van Woerkens, C., & Garretsen, H. (2016). Taxi drivers with a PhD: trickle down or crowding-out for lower educated workers in Dutch cities? Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society, 9(2), 405-422. https://doi.org/10.1093/cjres/rsw008

Author

Ponds, Roderik ; Marlet, Gerard ; van Woerkens, Clemens ; Garretsen, Harry. / Taxi drivers with a PhD : trickle down or crowding-out for lower educated workers in Dutch cities?. In: Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society. 2016 ; Vol. 9, No. 2. pp. 405-422.

Harvard

Ponds, R, Marlet, G, van Woerkens, C & Garretsen, H 2016, 'Taxi drivers with a PhD: trickle down or crowding-out for lower educated workers in Dutch cities?', Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 405-422. https://doi.org/10.1093/cjres/rsw008

Standard

Taxi drivers with a PhD : trickle down or crowding-out for lower educated workers in Dutch cities? / Ponds, Roderik; Marlet, Gerard; van Woerkens, Clemens; Garretsen, Harry.

In: Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society, Vol. 9, No. 2, 07.2016, p. 405-422.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Vancouver

Ponds R, Marlet G, van Woerkens C, Garretsen H. Taxi drivers with a PhD: trickle down or crowding-out for lower educated workers in Dutch cities? Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society. 2016 Jul;9(2):405-422. https://doi.org/10.1093/cjres/rsw008


BibTeX

@article{257b37e3e8d2423ab1802a921f3c8b06,
title = "Taxi drivers with a PhD: trickle down or crowding-out for lower educated workers in Dutch cities?",
abstract = "Attracting higher educated workers is often seen as a means to stimulate employment in cities in general, leading to lower unemployment for the lower educated, the ‘trickle-down’ effect. However, lower educated workers may also experience crowding-out effects if these higher educated inhabitants accept jobs below their educational level. Based on an empirical analysis of a cross-section of Dutch cities, we find that these crowding-out effects indeed seem to occur. This implies that a trickle-down strategy cannot be seen as a panacea by urban policymakers for the problem of high unemployment amongst lower educated workers.",
author = "Roderik Ponds and Gerard Marlet and {van Woerkens}, Clemens and Harry Garretsen",
year = "2016",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1093/cjres/rsw008",
language = "English",
volume = "9",
pages = "405--422",
journal = "Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society",
issn = "1752-1378",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Taxi drivers with a PhD

T2 - trickle down or crowding-out for lower educated workers in Dutch cities?

AU - Ponds, Roderik

AU - Marlet, Gerard

AU - van Woerkens, Clemens

AU - Garretsen, Harry

PY - 2016/7

Y1 - 2016/7

N2 - Attracting higher educated workers is often seen as a means to stimulate employment in cities in general, leading to lower unemployment for the lower educated, the ‘trickle-down’ effect. However, lower educated workers may also experience crowding-out effects if these higher educated inhabitants accept jobs below their educational level. Based on an empirical analysis of a cross-section of Dutch cities, we find that these crowding-out effects indeed seem to occur. This implies that a trickle-down strategy cannot be seen as a panacea by urban policymakers for the problem of high unemployment amongst lower educated workers.

AB - Attracting higher educated workers is often seen as a means to stimulate employment in cities in general, leading to lower unemployment for the lower educated, the ‘trickle-down’ effect. However, lower educated workers may also experience crowding-out effects if these higher educated inhabitants accept jobs below their educational level. Based on an empirical analysis of a cross-section of Dutch cities, we find that these crowding-out effects indeed seem to occur. This implies that a trickle-down strategy cannot be seen as a panacea by urban policymakers for the problem of high unemployment amongst lower educated workers.

U2 - 10.1093/cjres/rsw008

DO - 10.1093/cjres/rsw008

M3 - Article

VL - 9

SP - 405

EP - 422

JO - Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society

JF - Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society

SN - 1752-1378

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 34316369