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Surveillance-embedded genomic outbreak resolution of methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus in a neonatal intensive care unit

Coolen, J. P. M., Bleeker-Rovers, C. P., van der Geest-Blankert, A. D. J., Haverkate, D., Henriet, S. S. V., Huynen, M. A., Kolwijck, E., Liem, D., Melchers, W. J. G., Rossen, J. W., Zoll, J., van Heijst, A., Hopman, J. & Wertheim, H. F. L., 14-Feb-2020, In : Scientific Reports. 10, 1, 10 p., 2619.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

  • J P M Coolen
  • C P Bleeker-Rovers
  • A D J van der Geest-Blankert
  • D Haverkate
  • S S V Henriet
  • M A Huynen
  • E Kolwijck
  • D Liem
  • W J G Melchers
  • J W Rossen
  • J Zoll
  • A van Heijst
  • J Hopman
  • H F L Wertheim

We observed an increase in methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) infections at a Dutch neonatal intensive care unit. Weekly neonatal MSSA carriage surveillance and cross-sectional screenings of health care workers (HCWs) were available for outbreak tracing. Traditional clustering of MSSA isolates by spa typing and Multiple-Locus Variable number tandem repeat Analysis (MLVA) suggested that nosocomial transmission had contributed to the infections. We investigated whether whole-genome sequencing (WGS) of MSSA surveillance would provide additional evidence for transmission. MSSA isolates from neonatal infections, carriage surveillance, and HCWs were subjected to WGS and bioinformatic analysis for identification and localization of high-quality single nucleotide polymorphisms, and in-depth analysis of subsets of isolates. By measuring the genetic diversity in background surveillance, we defined transmission-level relatedness and identified isolates that had been unjustly assigned to clusters based on MLVA, while spa typing was concordant but of insufficient resolution. Detailing particular subsets of isolates provided evidence that HCWs were involved in multiple outbreaks, yet it alleviated concerns about one particular HCW. The improved resolution and accuracy of genomic outbreak analyses substantially altered the view on outbreaks, along with apposite measures. Therefore, inclusion of the circulating background population has the potential to overcome current issues in genomic outbreak inference.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2619
Number of pages10
JournalScientific Reports
Volume10
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 14-Feb-2020

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