Publication

Structuring front office and back office work in service delivery systems - An empirical study of three design decisions

Zomerdijk, L. G. & de Vries, J., 2007, In : International Journal of Operations & Production Management. 27, 1, p. 108-131 24 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

APA

Zomerdijk, L. G., & de Vries, J. (2007). Structuring front office and back office work in service delivery systems - An empirical study of three design decisions. International Journal of Operations & Production Management, 27(1), 108-131. https://doi.org/10.1108/01443570710714565

Author

Zomerdijk, Leonleke G. ; de Vries, Jan. / Structuring front office and back office work in service delivery systems - An empirical study of three design decisions. In: International Journal of Operations & Production Management. 2007 ; Vol. 27, No. 1. pp. 108-131.

Harvard

Zomerdijk, LG & de Vries, J 2007, 'Structuring front office and back office work in service delivery systems - An empirical study of three design decisions' International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 27, no. 1, pp. 108-131. https://doi.org/10.1108/01443570710714565

Standard

Structuring front office and back office work in service delivery systems - An empirical study of three design decisions. / Zomerdijk, Leonleke G.; de Vries, Jan.

In: International Journal of Operations & Production Management, Vol. 27, No. 1, 2007, p. 108-131.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Vancouver

Zomerdijk LG, de Vries J. Structuring front office and back office work in service delivery systems - An empirical study of three design decisions. International Journal of Operations & Production Management. 2007;27(1):108-131. https://doi.org/10.1108/01443570710714565


BibTeX

@article{d75ef4ddb66c4a48846444249f4b3ebc,
title = "Structuring front office and back office work in service delivery systems - An empirical study of three design decisions",
abstract = "Purpose - The aim of this paper is to investigate how the distinction between contact and non-contact activities influences the design of service delivery systems and to identify key design decisions for structuring front office and back office work.Design/methodology/approach - Building on current literature, the paper identifies three design decisions and associated performance trade-offs. The design decisions regard the degree of customer contact in the process, the decoupling of activities and the grouping of employees. The design decisions and the trade-offs are empirically validated in five case studies of 15 service delivery systems in the financial services sector.Findings - Distinguishing between the three design decisions is more suitable for describing today's practices than traditional front office - back office thinking. For each design decision a trade-off was observed consisting of several design considerations. However, the trade-offs do not involve the weighing of one set of performance objectives against another, as the design choices contribute to the same objectives, yet in different ways.Research limitations/implications - This study concentrated on a limited number of cases in the financial services sector. The contents of the trade-offs should be tested on a larger scale and in different industries. In order to develop design guidelines, future research should also examine the impact of contingency factors, such as the service being delivered and strategic priorities.Originality/value - The three design decisions and the trade-offs improve understanding of the impact of customer contact on a service organisation and provide support for designing service delivery systems in practice.",
keywords = "service operations, process planning, customer relations, service delivery systems, case studies, OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT, TRADE-OFFS, CUSTOMER, ORGANIZATION, ROOTS, MODEL, TEAM",
author = "Zomerdijk, {Leonleke G.} and {de Vries}, Jan",
year = "2007",
doi = "10.1108/01443570710714565",
language = "English",
volume = "27",
pages = "108--131",
journal = "International Journal of Operations & Production Management",
issn = "0144-3577",
publisher = "Emerald Group Publishing Limited",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Structuring front office and back office work in service delivery systems - An empirical study of three design decisions

AU - Zomerdijk, Leonleke G.

AU - de Vries, Jan

PY - 2007

Y1 - 2007

N2 - Purpose - The aim of this paper is to investigate how the distinction between contact and non-contact activities influences the design of service delivery systems and to identify key design decisions for structuring front office and back office work.Design/methodology/approach - Building on current literature, the paper identifies three design decisions and associated performance trade-offs. The design decisions regard the degree of customer contact in the process, the decoupling of activities and the grouping of employees. The design decisions and the trade-offs are empirically validated in five case studies of 15 service delivery systems in the financial services sector.Findings - Distinguishing between the three design decisions is more suitable for describing today's practices than traditional front office - back office thinking. For each design decision a trade-off was observed consisting of several design considerations. However, the trade-offs do not involve the weighing of one set of performance objectives against another, as the design choices contribute to the same objectives, yet in different ways.Research limitations/implications - This study concentrated on a limited number of cases in the financial services sector. The contents of the trade-offs should be tested on a larger scale and in different industries. In order to develop design guidelines, future research should also examine the impact of contingency factors, such as the service being delivered and strategic priorities.Originality/value - The three design decisions and the trade-offs improve understanding of the impact of customer contact on a service organisation and provide support for designing service delivery systems in practice.

AB - Purpose - The aim of this paper is to investigate how the distinction between contact and non-contact activities influences the design of service delivery systems and to identify key design decisions for structuring front office and back office work.Design/methodology/approach - Building on current literature, the paper identifies three design decisions and associated performance trade-offs. The design decisions regard the degree of customer contact in the process, the decoupling of activities and the grouping of employees. The design decisions and the trade-offs are empirically validated in five case studies of 15 service delivery systems in the financial services sector.Findings - Distinguishing between the three design decisions is more suitable for describing today's practices than traditional front office - back office thinking. For each design decision a trade-off was observed consisting of several design considerations. However, the trade-offs do not involve the weighing of one set of performance objectives against another, as the design choices contribute to the same objectives, yet in different ways.Research limitations/implications - This study concentrated on a limited number of cases in the financial services sector. The contents of the trade-offs should be tested on a larger scale and in different industries. In order to develop design guidelines, future research should also examine the impact of contingency factors, such as the service being delivered and strategic priorities.Originality/value - The three design decisions and the trade-offs improve understanding of the impact of customer contact on a service organisation and provide support for designing service delivery systems in practice.

KW - service operations

KW - process planning

KW - customer relations

KW - service delivery systems

KW - case studies

KW - OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT

KW - TRADE-OFFS

KW - CUSTOMER

KW - ORGANIZATION

KW - ROOTS

KW - MODEL

KW - TEAM

U2 - 10.1108/01443570710714565

DO - 10.1108/01443570710714565

M3 - Article

VL - 27

SP - 108

EP - 131

JO - International Journal of Operations & Production Management

JF - International Journal of Operations & Production Management

SN - 0144-3577

IS - 1

ER -

ID: 4533629