Publication

Social comparison, coping and depression in people with spinal cord injury

Buunk, A. P., Zurriaga, R. & Gonzalez, P., Dec-2006, In : Psychology & Health. 21, 6, p. 791-807 17 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

  • Abraham P. Buunk
  • Rosario Zurriaga
  • Pilar Gonzalez

The present study among 70 people with spinal cord injury examined the prevalence and correlates of identification (seeing others as a potential future) and contrast (seeing others in competitive terms) in social comparison as related to coping and depression. The most prevalent social comparison strategy was downward contrast (a positive response to seeing others who were worse-off), followed by upward identification (a positive response to perceiving better-off others as a potential future), downward identification (a negative response to perceiving worse-off others as a potential future), and upward contrast (a negative response to seeing others who were better-off). Those with less severe lesions reported the highest levels of upward contrast, coping through blaming others, and depression. Downward contrast was particularly related to constructive coping, and upward identification to wishful thinking. The less adaptive social comparison strategies, i.e., upward contrast and downward identification, were quite strongly related to wishful thinking and blaming others. Particularly upward contrast, i.e., feeling bad as response to seeing that others are better-off, was related to depression.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)791-807
Number of pages17
JournalPsychology & Health
Volume21
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - Dec-2006

    Keywords

  • social comparison, depression, spinal cord injury, coping, PSYCHOMETRIC PROPERTIES, DISABLED INDIVIDUALS, DOWNWARD EVALUATION, CANCER-TREATMENT, SELF-EVALUATION, HEALTH-STATUS, ADJUSTMENT, IMPACT, PSYCHOLOGY, ARTHRITIS

ID: 1506381