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Sexual Abuse History in GI Illness, How Do Gastroenterologists Deal with It?

Nicolai, M. P. J., Fidder, H. H., Beck, J. J. H., Bekker, M. D., Putter, H., Pelger, R. C. M., van Driel, M. F. & Elzevier, H. W., May-2012, In : Journal of Sexual Medicine. 9, 5, p. 1277-1284 8 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

  • Melianthe P. J. Nicolai
  • Herma H. Fidder
  • Jack J. H. Beck
  • Milou D. Bekker
  • Hein Putter
  • Rob C. M. Pelger
  • Mels F. van Driel
  • Henk W. Elzevier

Introduction. Data support an increased prevalence of sexual abuse (SA) among patients with gastrointestinal (GI) complaints. Sexual abuse causes multiple symptoms related to pelvic floor and stress mediated brain-gut dysfunctions. Treating these patients asks for a holistic approach, using centrally targeted interventions. However, gastroenterologists have never been surveyed regarding their practice patterns and constraints about inquiring into SA. Aim. To evaluate whether gastroenterologists address SA in their daily practice and to evaluate their knowledge regarding the implications of SA in GI illness. Methods. A 42-item anonymous questionnaire was mailed to all 402 members of the Dutch Society of Gastroenterology (gastroenterologists and fellows in training). The questionnaire addressed SA and pelvic-floor-related complaints. Main Outcome Measures. The results of this survey. Results. One hundred eighty-three of the 402 (45.2%) questionnaires were returned. Overall, 4.7% of the respondents asked their female patients regularly about SA; in males, this percentage was 0.6%. Before performing a colonoscopy, these percentages were even smaller (2.4% and 0.6%, respectively). When patients presented with specific complaints, such as chronic abdominal pain or fecal incontinence, 68% of the gastroenterologists asked females about SA and 29% of the males (P <0.01). The majority of respondents stated it as rather important to receive more training on how to inquire about SA and its implications for treatment. Conclusion. Gastroenterologists do not routinely inquire about a history of SA and they rarely ask about it before performing colonoscopy. There is a need for training to acquire the skills and knowledge to deal with SA. Nicolai MPJ, Fidder HH, Beck JJ, Bekker MD, Putter H, Pelger RCM, van Driel MF, and Elzevier HW. Sexual abuse history in GI illness, how do gastroenterologists deal with it? J Sex Med 2012;9:12771284.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1277-1284
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Sexual Medicine
Volume9
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - May-2012

    Keywords

  • Sexual Abuse, Pelvic Floor, Abdominal Pain, Gastroenterology, Constipation, History, PELVIC-FLOOR COMPLAINTS, GASTROINTESTINAL DISORDERS, PHYSICAL ABUSE, PREVALENCE, WOMEN, EXPERIENCES, DISCOMFORT, SYMPTOMS, TRACT, CARE

ID: 5551222