Publication

Sensitive Survey Questions: Measuring Attitudes Regarding Female Genital Cutting Through a List Experiment

De Cao, E. & Lutz, C., Oct-2018, In : Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics. 80, 5, p. 871-892 22 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

APA

De Cao, E., & Lutz, C. (2018). Sensitive Survey Questions: Measuring Attitudes Regarding Female Genital Cutting Through a List Experiment. Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, 80(5), 871-892. https://doi.org/10.1111/obes.12228

Author

De Cao, Elisabetta ; Lutz, Clemens. / Sensitive Survey Questions : Measuring Attitudes Regarding Female Genital Cutting Through a List Experiment. In: Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics. 2018 ; Vol. 80, No. 5. pp. 871-892.

Harvard

De Cao, E & Lutz, C 2018, 'Sensitive Survey Questions: Measuring Attitudes Regarding Female Genital Cutting Through a List Experiment', Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, vol. 80, no. 5, pp. 871-892. https://doi.org/10.1111/obes.12228

Standard

Sensitive Survey Questions : Measuring Attitudes Regarding Female Genital Cutting Through a List Experiment. / De Cao, Elisabetta; Lutz, Clemens.

In: Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Vol. 80, No. 5, 10.2018, p. 871-892.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Vancouver

De Cao E, Lutz C. Sensitive Survey Questions: Measuring Attitudes Regarding Female Genital Cutting Through a List Experiment. Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics. 2018 Oct;80(5):871-892. https://doi.org/10.1111/obes.12228


BibTeX

@article{d1828994e8d54785b03a2bedf1cc2059,
title = "Sensitive Survey Questions: Measuring Attitudes Regarding Female Genital Cutting Through a List Experiment",
abstract = "Potential bias in survey responses is higher if sensitive outcomes are measured. This study analyses attitudes towards female genital cutting (FGC) in Ethiopia. A list experiment is designed to elicit truthful answers about FGC support and compares these outcomes with the answers given to a direct question. Our results confirm that the average bias is substantial as answers to direct questions underestimate the FGC support by about 10 percentage points. Moreover, our results provide suggestive but not statistically significant evidence that this bias is more pronounced among uneducated women and women targeted by an NGO intervention (not randomly assigned).",
keywords = "STATISTICAL-ANALYSIS, COUNT TECHNIQUE, BEHAVIOR, BIAS",
author = "{De Cao}, Elisabetta and Clemens Lutz",
year = "2018",
month = oct,
doi = "10.1111/obes.12228",
language = "English",
volume = "80",
pages = "871--892",
journal = "Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics",
issn = "0305-9049",
publisher = "Wiley",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Sensitive Survey Questions

T2 - Measuring Attitudes Regarding Female Genital Cutting Through a List Experiment

AU - De Cao, Elisabetta

AU - Lutz, Clemens

PY - 2018/10

Y1 - 2018/10

N2 - Potential bias in survey responses is higher if sensitive outcomes are measured. This study analyses attitudes towards female genital cutting (FGC) in Ethiopia. A list experiment is designed to elicit truthful answers about FGC support and compares these outcomes with the answers given to a direct question. Our results confirm that the average bias is substantial as answers to direct questions underestimate the FGC support by about 10 percentage points. Moreover, our results provide suggestive but not statistically significant evidence that this bias is more pronounced among uneducated women and women targeted by an NGO intervention (not randomly assigned).

AB - Potential bias in survey responses is higher if sensitive outcomes are measured. This study analyses attitudes towards female genital cutting (FGC) in Ethiopia. A list experiment is designed to elicit truthful answers about FGC support and compares these outcomes with the answers given to a direct question. Our results confirm that the average bias is substantial as answers to direct questions underestimate the FGC support by about 10 percentage points. Moreover, our results provide suggestive but not statistically significant evidence that this bias is more pronounced among uneducated women and women targeted by an NGO intervention (not randomly assigned).

KW - STATISTICAL-ANALYSIS

KW - COUNT TECHNIQUE

KW - BEHAVIOR

KW - BIAS

U2 - 10.1111/obes.12228

DO - 10.1111/obes.12228

M3 - Article

VL - 80

SP - 871

EP - 892

JO - Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics

JF - Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics

SN - 0305-9049

IS - 5

ER -

ID: 55369787