Publication

Self-Monitoring and Linguistic Adaptation

Blank, H., Ziegler, R. & de Bloom, J., 2012, In : Social Psychology. 43, 2, p. 67-80 14 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

APA

Blank, H., Ziegler, R., & de Bloom, J. (2012). Self-Monitoring and Linguistic Adaptation. Social Psychology, 43(2), 67-80. https://doi.org/10.1027/1864-9335/a000085

Author

Blank, Hartmut ; Ziegler, Rene ; de Bloom, Jessica. / Self-Monitoring and Linguistic Adaptation. In: Social Psychology. 2012 ; Vol. 43, No. 2. pp. 67-80.

Harvard

Blank, H, Ziegler, R & de Bloom, J 2012, 'Self-Monitoring and Linguistic Adaptation', Social Psychology, vol. 43, no. 2, pp. 67-80. https://doi.org/10.1027/1864-9335/a000085

Standard

Self-Monitoring and Linguistic Adaptation. / Blank, Hartmut; Ziegler, Rene; de Bloom, Jessica.

In: Social Psychology, Vol. 43, No. 2, 2012, p. 67-80.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Vancouver

Blank H, Ziegler R, de Bloom J. Self-Monitoring and Linguistic Adaptation. Social Psychology. 2012;43(2):67-80. https://doi.org/10.1027/1864-9335/a000085


BibTeX

@article{aa4d62a35b654b11b5a9c808c23e2583,
title = "Self-Monitoring and Linguistic Adaptation",
abstract = "This article explores the role of self-monitoring in the adaptation to different linguistic environments (dialects and foreign languages). An internet study (N = 505) found the motivation and ability of speakers of local German dialects to switch to the German high language (as measured by a specifically developed scale) to be moderately related (r = .24) to their self-monitoring scores. Further analyses found this relationship to be stronger for people with stronger dialects. Also, in a survey of German first-year students (N = 88) at a Dutch university, self-monitoring was strongly related (r = .43) to a scale measuring various aspects of adaptation to the Dutch language; high self-monitors also reported less social and study-related problems due to language. We conclude from these results that self-monitoring is an important determinant of oral linguistic adaptation. Put differently, our findings extend the reach of the self-monitoring construct to the domain of language.",
keywords = "personality, self-monitoring, language, linguistic adaptation, INDIVIDUAL-DIFFERENCES, EXPRESSIVE BEHAVIOR, CULTURAL ADJUSTMENT, PERSONALITY-TRAITS, BIG-5 INVENTORY, VALIDITY, SITUATIONS, GERMAN, SKILLS",
author = "Hartmut Blank and Rene Ziegler and {de Bloom}, Jessica",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.1027/1864-9335/a000085",
language = "English",
volume = "43",
pages = "67--80",
journal = "Social Psychology",
issn = "1864-9335",
publisher = "Hogrefe Publishing",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Self-Monitoring and Linguistic Adaptation

AU - Blank, Hartmut

AU - Ziegler, Rene

AU - de Bloom, Jessica

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - This article explores the role of self-monitoring in the adaptation to different linguistic environments (dialects and foreign languages). An internet study (N = 505) found the motivation and ability of speakers of local German dialects to switch to the German high language (as measured by a specifically developed scale) to be moderately related (r = .24) to their self-monitoring scores. Further analyses found this relationship to be stronger for people with stronger dialects. Also, in a survey of German first-year students (N = 88) at a Dutch university, self-monitoring was strongly related (r = .43) to a scale measuring various aspects of adaptation to the Dutch language; high self-monitors also reported less social and study-related problems due to language. We conclude from these results that self-monitoring is an important determinant of oral linguistic adaptation. Put differently, our findings extend the reach of the self-monitoring construct to the domain of language.

AB - This article explores the role of self-monitoring in the adaptation to different linguistic environments (dialects and foreign languages). An internet study (N = 505) found the motivation and ability of speakers of local German dialects to switch to the German high language (as measured by a specifically developed scale) to be moderately related (r = .24) to their self-monitoring scores. Further analyses found this relationship to be stronger for people with stronger dialects. Also, in a survey of German first-year students (N = 88) at a Dutch university, self-monitoring was strongly related (r = .43) to a scale measuring various aspects of adaptation to the Dutch language; high self-monitors also reported less social and study-related problems due to language. We conclude from these results that self-monitoring is an important determinant of oral linguistic adaptation. Put differently, our findings extend the reach of the self-monitoring construct to the domain of language.

KW - personality

KW - self-monitoring

KW - language

KW - linguistic adaptation

KW - INDIVIDUAL-DIFFERENCES

KW - EXPRESSIVE BEHAVIOR

KW - CULTURAL ADJUSTMENT

KW - PERSONALITY-TRAITS

KW - BIG-5 INVENTORY

KW - VALIDITY

KW - SITUATIONS

KW - GERMAN

KW - SKILLS

U2 - 10.1027/1864-9335/a000085

DO - 10.1027/1864-9335/a000085

M3 - Article

VL - 43

SP - 67

EP - 80

JO - Social Psychology

JF - Social Psychology

SN - 1864-9335

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 61649543