Publication

Sacrospinous hysteropexy versus vaginal hysterectomy with uterosacral ligament suspension in women with uterine prolapse stage 2 or higher: observational follow-up of a multicentre randomised trial

Schulten, S. F. M., Detollenaere, R. J., Stekelenburg, J., IntHout, J., Kluivers, K. B. & van Eijndhoven, H. W. F., 10-Sep-2019, In : BMJ (Clinical research ed.). 366, 10 p., 5149.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

  • Sascha F M Schulten
  • Renée J Detollenaere
  • Jelle Stekelenburg
  • Joanna IntHout
  • Kirsten B Kluivers
  • Hugo W F van Eijndhoven

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness and success of uterus preserving sacrospinous hysteropexy as an alternative to vaginal hysterectomy with uterosacral ligament suspension in the surgical treatment of uterine prolapse five years after surgery.

DESIGN: Observational follow-up of SAVE U (sacrospinous fixation versus vaginal hysterectomy in treatment of uterine prolapse ≥2) randomised controlled trial.

SETTING: Four non-university teaching hospitals, the Netherlands.

PARTICIPANTS: 204 of 208 healthy women in the initial trial (2009-12) with uterine prolapse stage 2 or higher requiring surgery and no history of pelvic floor surgery who had been randomised to sacrospinous hysteropexy or vaginal hysterectomy with uterosacral ligament suspension. The women were followed annually for five years after surgery. This extended trial reports the results at five years.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Prespecified primary outcome evaluated at five year follow-up was recurrent prolapse of the uterus or vaginal vault (apical compartment) stage 2 or higher evaluated by pelvic organ prolapse quantification system in combination with bothersome bulge symptoms or repeat surgery for recurrent apical prolapse. Secondary outcomes were overall anatomical failure (recurrent prolapse stage 2 or higher in apical, anterior, or posterior compartment), composite outcome of success (defined as no prolapse beyond the hymen, no bothersome bulge symptoms, and no repeat surgery or pessary use for recurrent prolapse), functional outcome, quality of life, repeat surgery, and sexual functioning.

RESULTS: At five years, surgical failure of the apical compartment with bothersome bulge symptoms or repeat surgery occurred in one woman (1%) after sacrospinous hysteropexy compared with eight women (7.8%) after vaginal hysterectomy with uterosacral ligament suspension (difference-6.7%, 95% confidence interval -12.8% to-0.7%). A statistically significant difference was found in composite outcome of success between sacrospinous hysteropexy and vaginal hysterectomy (89/102 (87%) v 77/102 (76%). The other secondary outcomes did not differ. Time-to-event analysis at five years showed no differences between the interventions.

CONCLUSIONS: At five year follow-up significantly less anatomical recurrences of the apical compartment with bothersome bulge symptoms or repeat surgery were found after sacrospinous hysteropexy compared with vaginal hysterectomy with uterosacral ligament suspension. After hysteropexy a higher proportion of women had a composite outcome of success. Time-to-event analysis showed no differences in outcomes between the procedures.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: trialregister.nl NTR1866.

Original languageEnglish
Article number5149
Number of pages10
JournalBMJ (Clinical research ed.)
Volume366
Publication statusPublished - 10-Sep-2019
Related Prizes
  1. Best Clinical/Surgical Abstract

    Sascha F M Schulten (Recipient), Renee Detollenaere (Recipient), Jelle Stekelenburg (Recipient), Joanna IntHout (Recipient), Kirsten B. Kluivers (Recipient) & Hugo Van Eijndhoven (Recipient), 17-Oct-2019

    PrizeAcademic

View all (1) »

View graph of relations

Download statistics

No data available

ID: 96564989