Publication

Reproducibility Issues: Avoiding Pitfalls in Animal Inflammation Models

Laman, J. D., Kooistra, S. M. & Clausen, B. E., 2017, Inflammation: Methods and Protocols. Clausen, B. E. & Laman, J. D. (eds.). Springer, Vol. 1559. p. 1-17 17 p.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterAcademic

APA

Laman, J. D., Kooistra, S. M., & Clausen, B. E. (2017). Reproducibility Issues: Avoiding Pitfalls in Animal Inflammation Models. In B. E. Clausen, & J. D. Laman (Eds.), Inflammation: Methods and Protocols (Vol. 1559, pp. 1-17). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-6786-5_1

Author

Laman, Jon D ; Kooistra, Susanne M ; Clausen, Björn E. / Reproducibility Issues : Avoiding Pitfalls in Animal Inflammation Models. Inflammation: Methods and Protocols. editor / Björn E. Clausen ; Jon D. Laman. Vol. 1559 Springer, 2017. pp. 1-17

Harvard

Laman, JD, Kooistra, SM & Clausen, BE 2017, Reproducibility Issues: Avoiding Pitfalls in Animal Inflammation Models. in BE Clausen & JD Laman (eds), Inflammation: Methods and Protocols. vol. 1559, Springer, pp. 1-17. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-6786-5_1

Standard

Reproducibility Issues : Avoiding Pitfalls in Animal Inflammation Models. / Laman, Jon D; Kooistra, Susanne M; Clausen, Björn E.

Inflammation: Methods and Protocols. ed. / Björn E. Clausen; Jon D. Laman. Vol. 1559 Springer, 2017. p. 1-17.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterAcademic

Vancouver

Laman JD, Kooistra SM, Clausen BE. Reproducibility Issues: Avoiding Pitfalls in Animal Inflammation Models. In Clausen BE, Laman JD, editors, Inflammation: Methods and Protocols. Vol. 1559. Springer. 2017. p. 1-17 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-6786-5_1


BibTeX

@inbook{356d8150e79c4288a2aa690d6df03693,
title = "Reproducibility Issues: Avoiding Pitfalls in Animal Inflammation Models",
abstract = "In light of an enhanced awareness of ethical questions and ever increasing costs when working with animals in biomedical research, there is a dedicated and sometimes fierce debate concerning the (lack of) reproducibility of animal models and their relevance for human inflammatory diseases. Despite evident advancements in searching for alternatives, that is, replacing, reducing, and refining animal experiments-the three R's of Russel and Burch (1959)-understanding the complex interactions of the cells of the immune system, the nervous system and the affected tissue/organ during inflammation critically relies on in vivo models. Consequently, scientific advancement and ultimately novel therapeutic interventions depend on improving the reproducibility of animal inflammation models. As a prelude to the remaining hands-on protocols described in this volume, here, we summarize potential pitfalls of preclinical animal research and provide resources and background reading on how to avoid them.",
keywords = "Journal Article",
author = "Laman, {Jon D} and Kooistra, {Susanne M} and Clausen, {Bj{\"o}rn E}",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1007/978-1-4939-6786-5_1",
language = "English",
isbn = "978-1-4939-6784-1",
volume = "1559",
pages = "1--17",
editor = "Clausen, {Bj{\"o}rn E.} and Laman, {Jon D.}",
booktitle = "Inflammation",
publisher = "Springer",

}

RIS

TY - CHAP

T1 - Reproducibility Issues

T2 - Avoiding Pitfalls in Animal Inflammation Models

AU - Laman, Jon D

AU - Kooistra, Susanne M

AU - Clausen, Björn E

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - In light of an enhanced awareness of ethical questions and ever increasing costs when working with animals in biomedical research, there is a dedicated and sometimes fierce debate concerning the (lack of) reproducibility of animal models and their relevance for human inflammatory diseases. Despite evident advancements in searching for alternatives, that is, replacing, reducing, and refining animal experiments-the three R's of Russel and Burch (1959)-understanding the complex interactions of the cells of the immune system, the nervous system and the affected tissue/organ during inflammation critically relies on in vivo models. Consequently, scientific advancement and ultimately novel therapeutic interventions depend on improving the reproducibility of animal inflammation models. As a prelude to the remaining hands-on protocols described in this volume, here, we summarize potential pitfalls of preclinical animal research and provide resources and background reading on how to avoid them.

AB - In light of an enhanced awareness of ethical questions and ever increasing costs when working with animals in biomedical research, there is a dedicated and sometimes fierce debate concerning the (lack of) reproducibility of animal models and their relevance for human inflammatory diseases. Despite evident advancements in searching for alternatives, that is, replacing, reducing, and refining animal experiments-the three R's of Russel and Burch (1959)-understanding the complex interactions of the cells of the immune system, the nervous system and the affected tissue/organ during inflammation critically relies on in vivo models. Consequently, scientific advancement and ultimately novel therapeutic interventions depend on improving the reproducibility of animal inflammation models. As a prelude to the remaining hands-on protocols described in this volume, here, we summarize potential pitfalls of preclinical animal research and provide resources and background reading on how to avoid them.

KW - Journal Article

U2 - 10.1007/978-1-4939-6786-5_1

DO - 10.1007/978-1-4939-6786-5_1

M3 - Chapter

C2 - 28063033

SN - 978-1-4939-6784-1

VL - 1559

SP - 1

EP - 17

BT - Inflammation

A2 - Clausen, Björn E.

A2 - Laman, Jon D.

PB - Springer

ER -

ID: 41916988