Publication

Regulators of B-cell activity in SLE: a better target for treatment than B-cell depletion?

Dolff, S., Abdulahad, W. H., Bijl, M. & Kallenberg, C. G. M., Jun-2009, In : Lupus. 18, 7, p. 575-580 6 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleAcademicpeer-review

B cells, being a source of characteristic antinuclear autoantibodies, play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Evidences indicate that alterations in B-cell regulation are responsible for B-cell hyperactivity as seen in SLE. T cells, soluble factors, and even B cells themselves regulate effector B-cell functions. The latter, so-called regulatory B cells possess regulatory function through production of the cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) that can damp down the humoral immune responses. This review will focus on B-cell regulation in the pathogenesis of SLE as a target for intervention. In particular, the regulatory impact of T cells through costimulation, soluble factors such as B lymphocyte stimulator, and the characteristics of IL 10-producing regulatory B cells will be discussed. Therapies targeting B cells as well as B-cell regulation seem promising, but the precise mechanisms involved in these interventions are not completely understood. More insight into B-cell regulation in SLE, and particularly in regulatory B cells, could lead to novel therapeutic strategies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)575-580
Number of pages6
JournalLupus
Volume18
Issue number7
Publication statusPublished - Jun-2009

    Keywords

  • B-cell regulation, SLE, IL-10, SYSTEMIC-LUPUS-ERYTHEMATOSUS, ANTI-DNA ANTIBODIES, LYMPHOCYTE STIMULATOR, RHEUMATOID-ARTHRITIS, AUTOIMMUNE-DISEASE, MONOCLONAL-ANTIBODY, CUTTING EDGE, MURINE LUPUS, T-CELLS, RITUXIMAB

ID: 2004891