Publication

Psychosis liability, paranoia and distress in experimental virtual reality social environments

Veling, W., Pot-Kolder, R., Counotte, J. & Van Der Gaag, M., 1-Apr-2014, p. 377-378. 2 p.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePosterAcademic

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  • Poster #T249 PSYCHOSIS LIABILITY, PARANOIA AND DISTRESS IN EXPERIMENTAL VIRTUAL REALITY SOCIAL ENVIRONMENTS

    Final publisher's version, 111 KB, PDF document

DOI

Background: Psychotic syndromes can be understood as disorders of adaptation to social context. It is not clear, however, how symptoms of psychosis develop in the daily social environment, in interaction with individual liability. Virtual Reality (VR) technology may help to investigate relationships between environment and psychosis, as it allows controlled exposure to various social risk environments. Methods: Four groups (total N=54) with different liability to psychosis (patients with first episode psychosis (FEP), siblings, ultra high risk individuals (UHR) and healthy controls) were exposed to virtual social environments. Psychological and physiological responses were measured repeatedly. The virtual environment was varied with regard to social stressors (population density, ethnic density and hostility of avatars). Results: Paranoid thoughts and social anxiety in real life correlated significantly with paranoid thoughts about avatars and subjective distress in virtual social stress environments (Spearman's correlation coefficients 0.4 0.5, p
Original languageEnglish
Pages377-378
Number of pages2
Publication statusPublished - 1-Apr-2014

    Keywords

  • paranoia, virtual reality, social environment, schizophrenia, psychosis, environment, risk, sibling, social stress, patient, anxiety, correlation coefficient, human, hostility, exposure, density, technology, population density, habituation, rank sum test, arousal, adaptation, stress, diseases

ID: 72811258