Publication

Psychopathology among homicidally bereaved individuals: A systematic review

van Denderen, M., de Keijser, J., Kleen, M. & Boelen, P. A., 2015, In : Trauma, Violence, & Abuse. 16, 1, p. 70-80 11 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

APA

van Denderen, M., de Keijser, J., Kleen, M., & Boelen, P. A. (2015). Psychopathology among homicidally bereaved individuals: A systematic review. Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, 16(1), 70-80. https://doi.org/10.1177/1524838013515757

Author

van Denderen, Mariëtte ; de Keijser, Jos ; Kleen, Marco ; Boelen, Paul A. / Psychopathology among homicidally bereaved individuals : A systematic review. In: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse. 2015 ; Vol. 16, No. 1. pp. 70-80.

Harvard

van Denderen, M, de Keijser, J, Kleen, M & Boelen, PA 2015, 'Psychopathology among homicidally bereaved individuals: A systematic review', Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, vol. 16, no. 1, pp. 70-80. https://doi.org/10.1177/1524838013515757

Standard

Psychopathology among homicidally bereaved individuals : A systematic review. / van Denderen, Mariëtte; de Keijser, Jos; Kleen, Marco; Boelen, Paul A.

In: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Vol. 16, No. 1, 2015, p. 70-80.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Vancouver

van Denderen M, de Keijser J, Kleen M, Boelen PA. Psychopathology among homicidally bereaved individuals: A systematic review. Trauma, Violence, & Abuse. 2015;16(1):70-80. https://doi.org/10.1177/1524838013515757


BibTeX

@article{2ed207bab2d04711872e39c3375c1e26,
title = "Psychopathology among homicidally bereaved individuals: A systematic review",
abstract = "In the literature on bereavement, claims are made that homicidal loss is associated with posttraumatic stress reactions, depression, and other severe mental health problems. It is surprising that only a few studies have investigated the nature and prevalence of emotional symptoms following homicidal bereavement and a reference to systematic, empirical research is seldom provided. This article reviews the available literature to investigate whether these claims have empirical evidence. Three databases were searched to identify relevant studies. This approach was supplemented with a bibliography search. Eligible studies included English-language peer-reviewed articles that assessed psychopathology in the homicidally bereaved, as defined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Of the 360 potentially relevant articles, 8 studies (13 references) met predefined inclusion criteria. Homicide-related psychopathology among the bereaved assessed in these studies includes posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, complicated grief, and substance abuse. Prevalence of lifetime homicide-related PTSD varied from 19.1% to 71% across studies. Current PTSD varied between 5.2% and 6%. The reviewed literature was inconclusive regarding the course of symptoms over time and the severity of psychopathology among the homicidally bereaved, compared to individuals bereaved by other causes of death. A comparison of the nature and prevalence of psychopathology between studies was complicated by unequal sample sizes and type, recruitment strategy, study design, and time since loss. Limitations of the included studies are discussed, as well as implications for clinical practice, policy, and future research.",
author = "{van Denderen}, Mari{\"e}tte and {de Keijser}, Jos and Marco Kleen and Boelen, {Paul A.}",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1177/1524838013515757",
language = "English",
volume = "16",
pages = "70--80",
journal = "Trauma, Violence, & Abuse",
issn = "1524-8380",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Psychopathology among homicidally bereaved individuals

T2 - A systematic review

AU - van Denderen, Mariëtte

AU - de Keijser, Jos

AU - Kleen, Marco

AU - Boelen, Paul A.

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - In the literature on bereavement, claims are made that homicidal loss is associated with posttraumatic stress reactions, depression, and other severe mental health problems. It is surprising that only a few studies have investigated the nature and prevalence of emotional symptoms following homicidal bereavement and a reference to systematic, empirical research is seldom provided. This article reviews the available literature to investigate whether these claims have empirical evidence. Three databases were searched to identify relevant studies. This approach was supplemented with a bibliography search. Eligible studies included English-language peer-reviewed articles that assessed psychopathology in the homicidally bereaved, as defined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Of the 360 potentially relevant articles, 8 studies (13 references) met predefined inclusion criteria. Homicide-related psychopathology among the bereaved assessed in these studies includes posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, complicated grief, and substance abuse. Prevalence of lifetime homicide-related PTSD varied from 19.1% to 71% across studies. Current PTSD varied between 5.2% and 6%. The reviewed literature was inconclusive regarding the course of symptoms over time and the severity of psychopathology among the homicidally bereaved, compared to individuals bereaved by other causes of death. A comparison of the nature and prevalence of psychopathology between studies was complicated by unequal sample sizes and type, recruitment strategy, study design, and time since loss. Limitations of the included studies are discussed, as well as implications for clinical practice, policy, and future research.

AB - In the literature on bereavement, claims are made that homicidal loss is associated with posttraumatic stress reactions, depression, and other severe mental health problems. It is surprising that only a few studies have investigated the nature and prevalence of emotional symptoms following homicidal bereavement and a reference to systematic, empirical research is seldom provided. This article reviews the available literature to investigate whether these claims have empirical evidence. Three databases were searched to identify relevant studies. This approach was supplemented with a bibliography search. Eligible studies included English-language peer-reviewed articles that assessed psychopathology in the homicidally bereaved, as defined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Of the 360 potentially relevant articles, 8 studies (13 references) met predefined inclusion criteria. Homicide-related psychopathology among the bereaved assessed in these studies includes posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, complicated grief, and substance abuse. Prevalence of lifetime homicide-related PTSD varied from 19.1% to 71% across studies. Current PTSD varied between 5.2% and 6%. The reviewed literature was inconclusive regarding the course of symptoms over time and the severity of psychopathology among the homicidally bereaved, compared to individuals bereaved by other causes of death. A comparison of the nature and prevalence of psychopathology between studies was complicated by unequal sample sizes and type, recruitment strategy, study design, and time since loss. Limitations of the included studies are discussed, as well as implications for clinical practice, policy, and future research.

U2 - 10.1177/1524838013515757

DO - 10.1177/1524838013515757

M3 - Article

VL - 16

SP - 70

EP - 80

JO - Trauma, Violence, & Abuse

JF - Trauma, Violence, & Abuse

SN - 1524-8380

IS - 1

ER -

ID: 39059451