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Promoting Social Scaffolding Behaviors in Staff Members and Peer‐Directed Behaviors Among Persons With Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities: an interventions study

Nijs, S., Vlaskamp, C. & Maes, B., Jun-2018, In : Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities. 15, 2, p. 124-135 12 p.

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  • Promoting Social Scaffolding Behaviors in Staff Members and Peer‐Directed Behaviors Among Persons With Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities

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DOI

  • S Nijs
  • Carla Vlaskamp
  • B Maes
Persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) present limited peer‐directed behaviors toward their peers with PIMD. It is not clear how staff can facilitate and promote the mutual peer‐directed behaviors between persons with PIMD. In this study, we explored if peer‐directed behaviors among persons with PIMD can be increased by an intervention that is focused on training the staff in providing social scaffolding behaviors toward their clients. An A‐B‐B′‐C design was used in this study. A baseline condition was followed by two intervention conditions and a follow‐up. Four staff members participated in a training in which they were informed about peer interactions in persons with PIMD and learned how to promote these interactions. They developed a peer interaction supportive activity. This activity was provided to two persons with PIMD for 10 weeks. Social scaffolding behaviors of staff as well as peer‐directed behaviors of persons with PIMD were coded during videotaped observations. A significant increase of social scaffolding behaviors of staff members was observed during the intervention with a significant decrease at follow‐up. Significantly, more singular and fewer multiple peer‐directed behaviors of persons with PIMD were observed during the intervention. Both singular and multiple peer‐directed behaviors decreased again at follow‐up. A short training of staff members already positively affects their social scaffolding behaviors and increases the amount of peer‐directed behaviors of persons with PIMD. However, the amount of both behaviors decreased again at follow‐up. This argues to broadly apply this training in services and schools for persons with PIMD and to complement it with continuing staff coaching on this topic.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)124-135
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities
Volume15
Issue number2
Early online date6-Apr-2018
Publication statusPublished - Jun-2018

    Keywords

  • CHILDREN, STUDENTS, PEOPLE, PERSPECTIVE, FRIENDSHIPS, QUALITY, LIFE

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