Publication

Prognostic association of cardiac anxiety with new cardiac events and mortality following myocardial infarction

Van Beek, M. H. C. T., Zuidersma, M., Lappenschaar, M., Pop, G., Roest, A. M., Van Balkom, A. J. L. M., Speckens, A. E. M. & Oude Voshaar, R. C., Nov-2016, In : The British Journal of Psychiatry. 209, 5, p. 402-408 7 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

APA

Van Beek, M. H. C. T., Zuidersma, M., Lappenschaar, M., Pop, G., Roest, A. M., Van Balkom, A. J. L. M., Speckens, A. E. M., & Oude Voshaar, R. C. (2016). Prognostic association of cardiac anxiety with new cardiac events and mortality following myocardial infarction. The British Journal of Psychiatry, 209(5), 402-408. https://doi.org/10.1192/bjp.bp.115.174870

Author

Van Beek, Maria H. C. T. ; Zuidersma, Marij ; Lappenschaar, Martijn ; Pop, Gheorghe ; Roest, Annelieke M. ; Van Balkom, Anton J. L. M. ; Speckens, Anne E. M. ; Oude Voshaar, Richard C. / Prognostic association of cardiac anxiety with new cardiac events and mortality following myocardial infarction. In: The British Journal of Psychiatry. 2016 ; Vol. 209, No. 5. pp. 402-408.

Harvard

Van Beek, MHCT, Zuidersma, M, Lappenschaar, M, Pop, G, Roest, AM, Van Balkom, AJLM, Speckens, AEM & Oude Voshaar, RC 2016, 'Prognostic association of cardiac anxiety with new cardiac events and mortality following myocardial infarction', The British Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 209, no. 5, pp. 402-408. https://doi.org/10.1192/bjp.bp.115.174870

Standard

Prognostic association of cardiac anxiety with new cardiac events and mortality following myocardial infarction. / Van Beek, Maria H. C. T.; Zuidersma, Marij; Lappenschaar, Martijn; Pop, Gheorghe; Roest, Annelieke M.; Van Balkom, Anton J. L. M.; Speckens, Anne E. M.; Oude Voshaar, Richard C.

In: The British Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 209, No. 5, 11.2016, p. 402-408.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Vancouver

Van Beek MHCT, Zuidersma M, Lappenschaar M, Pop G, Roest AM, Van Balkom AJLM et al. Prognostic association of cardiac anxiety with new cardiac events and mortality following myocardial infarction. The British Journal of Psychiatry. 2016 Nov;209(5):402-408. https://doi.org/10.1192/bjp.bp.115.174870


BibTeX

@article{3bfa18ad6b2544bebcca2c8a4da851f5,
title = "Prognostic association of cardiac anxiety with new cardiac events and mortality following myocardial infarction",
abstract = "BackgroundGeneral anxiety and depressive symptoms following a myocardial infarction are associated with a worse cardiac prognosis. However, the contribution of specific aspects of anxiety within this context remains unclear.AimsTo evaluate the independent prognostic association of cardiac anxiety with cardiac outcome after myocardial infarction.MethodWe administered the Cardiac Anxiety Questionnaire (CAQ) during hospital admission (baseline, n=193) and 4 months (n=147/193) after discharge. CAQ subscale scores reflect fear, attention, avoidance and safety-seeking behaviour. Study end-point was a major adverse cardiac event (MACE): readmission for ischemic cardiac disease or all-cause mortality. In Cox regression analysis, we adjusted for age, cardiac disease severity and depressive symptoms.ResultsThe CAQ sum score at baseline and at 4 months significantly predicted a MACE (HRbaseline = 1.59, 95% Cl 1.04-2.43; HR4-months= 1.77, 95% Cl 1.04-3.02) with a mean follow-up of 4.2 (s.d.=2.0) years and 4.3 (s.d.=1.7) years respectively. Analyses of subscale scores revealed that this effect was particularly driven by avoidance (HRbaseline = 1.23, 95% Cl 0.99-1.53; HR4-months = 1.77, 95% Cl 1.04-1.83).ConclusionsCardiac anxiety, particularly anxiety-related avoidance of exercise, is an important prognostic factor for a MACE in patients after myocardial infarction, independent of cardiac disease severity and depressive symptoms.",
keywords = "CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE, LATENT CLASS ANALYSIS, CARDIOVASCULAR EVENTS, DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS, RISK, DISORDER, METAANALYSIS, PREDICTORS, DEATH, QUESTIONNAIRE",
author = "{Van Beek}, {Maria H. C. T.} and Marij Zuidersma and Martijn Lappenschaar and Gheorghe Pop and Roest, {Annelieke M.} and {Van Balkom}, {Anton J. L. M.} and Speckens, {Anne E. M.} and {Oude Voshaar}, {Richard C.}",
year = "2016",
month = nov,
doi = "10.1192/bjp.bp.115.174870",
language = "English",
volume = "209",
pages = "402--408",
journal = "The British Journal of Psychiatry",
issn = "0007-1250",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prognostic association of cardiac anxiety with new cardiac events and mortality following myocardial infarction

AU - Van Beek, Maria H. C. T.

AU - Zuidersma, Marij

AU - Lappenschaar, Martijn

AU - Pop, Gheorghe

AU - Roest, Annelieke M.

AU - Van Balkom, Anton J. L. M.

AU - Speckens, Anne E. M.

AU - Oude Voshaar, Richard C.

PY - 2016/11

Y1 - 2016/11

N2 - BackgroundGeneral anxiety and depressive symptoms following a myocardial infarction are associated with a worse cardiac prognosis. However, the contribution of specific aspects of anxiety within this context remains unclear.AimsTo evaluate the independent prognostic association of cardiac anxiety with cardiac outcome after myocardial infarction.MethodWe administered the Cardiac Anxiety Questionnaire (CAQ) during hospital admission (baseline, n=193) and 4 months (n=147/193) after discharge. CAQ subscale scores reflect fear, attention, avoidance and safety-seeking behaviour. Study end-point was a major adverse cardiac event (MACE): readmission for ischemic cardiac disease or all-cause mortality. In Cox regression analysis, we adjusted for age, cardiac disease severity and depressive symptoms.ResultsThe CAQ sum score at baseline and at 4 months significantly predicted a MACE (HRbaseline = 1.59, 95% Cl 1.04-2.43; HR4-months= 1.77, 95% Cl 1.04-3.02) with a mean follow-up of 4.2 (s.d.=2.0) years and 4.3 (s.d.=1.7) years respectively. Analyses of subscale scores revealed that this effect was particularly driven by avoidance (HRbaseline = 1.23, 95% Cl 0.99-1.53; HR4-months = 1.77, 95% Cl 1.04-1.83).ConclusionsCardiac anxiety, particularly anxiety-related avoidance of exercise, is an important prognostic factor for a MACE in patients after myocardial infarction, independent of cardiac disease severity and depressive symptoms.

AB - BackgroundGeneral anxiety and depressive symptoms following a myocardial infarction are associated with a worse cardiac prognosis. However, the contribution of specific aspects of anxiety within this context remains unclear.AimsTo evaluate the independent prognostic association of cardiac anxiety with cardiac outcome after myocardial infarction.MethodWe administered the Cardiac Anxiety Questionnaire (CAQ) during hospital admission (baseline, n=193) and 4 months (n=147/193) after discharge. CAQ subscale scores reflect fear, attention, avoidance and safety-seeking behaviour. Study end-point was a major adverse cardiac event (MACE): readmission for ischemic cardiac disease or all-cause mortality. In Cox regression analysis, we adjusted for age, cardiac disease severity and depressive symptoms.ResultsThe CAQ sum score at baseline and at 4 months significantly predicted a MACE (HRbaseline = 1.59, 95% Cl 1.04-2.43; HR4-months= 1.77, 95% Cl 1.04-3.02) with a mean follow-up of 4.2 (s.d.=2.0) years and 4.3 (s.d.=1.7) years respectively. Analyses of subscale scores revealed that this effect was particularly driven by avoidance (HRbaseline = 1.23, 95% Cl 0.99-1.53; HR4-months = 1.77, 95% Cl 1.04-1.83).ConclusionsCardiac anxiety, particularly anxiety-related avoidance of exercise, is an important prognostic factor for a MACE in patients after myocardial infarction, independent of cardiac disease severity and depressive symptoms.

KW - CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE

KW - LATENT CLASS ANALYSIS

KW - CARDIOVASCULAR EVENTS

KW - DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS

KW - RISK

KW - DISORDER

KW - METAANALYSIS

KW - PREDICTORS

KW - DEATH

KW - QUESTIONNAIRE

U2 - 10.1192/bjp.bp.115.174870

DO - 10.1192/bjp.bp.115.174870

M3 - Article

C2 - 27539297

VL - 209

SP - 402

EP - 408

JO - The British Journal of Psychiatry

JF - The British Journal of Psychiatry

SN - 0007-1250

IS - 5

ER -

ID: 35882465