Publication

Prenatal transfer of gut bacteria in Rock pigeon

Dietz, M. W., Salles, J. F., Hsu, B-Y., Dijkstra, C., Groothuis, T. G. G., van der Velde, M., Verkuil, Y. I. & Tieleman, B. I., Jan-2020, In : Microorganisms. 8, 1, 13 p., 61.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

APA

Dietz, M. W., Salles, J. F., Hsu, B-Y., Dijkstra, C., Groothuis, T. G. G., van der Velde, M., Verkuil, Y. I., & Tieleman, B. I. (2020). Prenatal transfer of gut bacteria in Rock pigeon. Microorganisms, 8(1), [61]. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8010061

Author

Dietz, Maurine W ; Salles, Joana F ; Hsu, Bin-Yan ; Dijkstra, Cor ; Groothuis, Ton G G ; van der Velde, Marco ; Verkuil, Yvonne I ; Tieleman, B Irene. / Prenatal transfer of gut bacteria in Rock pigeon. In: Microorganisms. 2020 ; Vol. 8, No. 1.

Harvard

Dietz, MW, Salles, JF, Hsu, B-Y, Dijkstra, C, Groothuis, TGG, van der Velde, M, Verkuil, YI & Tieleman, BI 2020, 'Prenatal transfer of gut bacteria in Rock pigeon', Microorganisms, vol. 8, no. 1, 61. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8010061

Standard

Prenatal transfer of gut bacteria in Rock pigeon. / Dietz, Maurine W; Salles, Joana F; Hsu, Bin-Yan; Dijkstra, Cor; Groothuis, Ton G G; van der Velde, Marco; Verkuil, Yvonne I; Tieleman, B Irene.

In: Microorganisms, Vol. 8, No. 1, 61, 01.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Vancouver

Dietz MW, Salles JF, Hsu B-Y, Dijkstra C, Groothuis TGG, van der Velde M et al. Prenatal transfer of gut bacteria in Rock pigeon. Microorganisms. 2020 Jan;8(1). 61. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8010061


BibTeX

@article{3ff839e5d51e4fcea447248f958e66cf,
title = "Prenatal transfer of gut bacteria in Rock pigeon",
abstract = "Vertebrates evolved in concert with bacteria and have developed essential mutualistic relationships. Gut bacteria are vital for the postnatal development of most organs and the immune and metabolic systems and may likewise play a role during prenatal development. Prenatal transfer of gut bacteria is shown in four mammalian species, including humans. For the 92% of the vertebrates that are oviparous, prenatal transfer is debated, but it has been demonstrated in domestic chicken. We hypothesize that also non-domestic birds can prenatally transmit gut bacteria. We investigated this in medium-sized Rock pigeon (Columba livia), ensuring neonates producing fair-sized first faeces. The first faeces of 21 neonate rock pigeons hatched in an incubator, contained a microbiome (bacterial community) the composition of which resembled the cloacal microbiome of females sampled from the same population (N = 5) as indicated by multiple shared phyla, orders, families, and genera. Neonates and females shared 16.1% of the total number of OTUs present (2881), and neonates shared 45.5% of their core microbiome with females. In contrast, the five females shared only 0.3% of the 1030 female OTUs present. These findings suggest that prenatal gut bacterial transfer may occur in birds. Our results support the hypothesis that gut bacteria may be important for prenatal development and present a heritability pathway of gut bacteria in vertebrates.",
keywords = "INTESTINAL MICROBIOTA, EGG VIABILITY, EARLY-LIFE, INCUBATION, EVOLUTION, CONTAMINATION, COLONIZATION, MECHANISMS, DIVERSITY, INFECTION",
author = "Dietz, {Maurine W} and Salles, {Joana F} and Bin-Yan Hsu and Cor Dijkstra and Groothuis, {Ton G G} and {van der Velde}, Marco and Verkuil, {Yvonne I} and Tieleman, {B Irene}",
year = "2020",
month = jan,
doi = "10.3390/microorganisms8010061",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
journal = "Microorganisms",
issn = "2076-2607",
publisher = "MDPI AG",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prenatal transfer of gut bacteria in Rock pigeon

AU - Dietz, Maurine W

AU - Salles, Joana F

AU - Hsu, Bin-Yan

AU - Dijkstra, Cor

AU - Groothuis, Ton G G

AU - van der Velde, Marco

AU - Verkuil, Yvonne I

AU - Tieleman, B Irene

PY - 2020/1

Y1 - 2020/1

N2 - Vertebrates evolved in concert with bacteria and have developed essential mutualistic relationships. Gut bacteria are vital for the postnatal development of most organs and the immune and metabolic systems and may likewise play a role during prenatal development. Prenatal transfer of gut bacteria is shown in four mammalian species, including humans. For the 92% of the vertebrates that are oviparous, prenatal transfer is debated, but it has been demonstrated in domestic chicken. We hypothesize that also non-domestic birds can prenatally transmit gut bacteria. We investigated this in medium-sized Rock pigeon (Columba livia), ensuring neonates producing fair-sized first faeces. The first faeces of 21 neonate rock pigeons hatched in an incubator, contained a microbiome (bacterial community) the composition of which resembled the cloacal microbiome of females sampled from the same population (N = 5) as indicated by multiple shared phyla, orders, families, and genera. Neonates and females shared 16.1% of the total number of OTUs present (2881), and neonates shared 45.5% of their core microbiome with females. In contrast, the five females shared only 0.3% of the 1030 female OTUs present. These findings suggest that prenatal gut bacterial transfer may occur in birds. Our results support the hypothesis that gut bacteria may be important for prenatal development and present a heritability pathway of gut bacteria in vertebrates.

AB - Vertebrates evolved in concert with bacteria and have developed essential mutualistic relationships. Gut bacteria are vital for the postnatal development of most organs and the immune and metabolic systems and may likewise play a role during prenatal development. Prenatal transfer of gut bacteria is shown in four mammalian species, including humans. For the 92% of the vertebrates that are oviparous, prenatal transfer is debated, but it has been demonstrated in domestic chicken. We hypothesize that also non-domestic birds can prenatally transmit gut bacteria. We investigated this in medium-sized Rock pigeon (Columba livia), ensuring neonates producing fair-sized first faeces. The first faeces of 21 neonate rock pigeons hatched in an incubator, contained a microbiome (bacterial community) the composition of which resembled the cloacal microbiome of females sampled from the same population (N = 5) as indicated by multiple shared phyla, orders, families, and genera. Neonates and females shared 16.1% of the total number of OTUs present (2881), and neonates shared 45.5% of their core microbiome with females. In contrast, the five females shared only 0.3% of the 1030 female OTUs present. These findings suggest that prenatal gut bacterial transfer may occur in birds. Our results support the hypothesis that gut bacteria may be important for prenatal development and present a heritability pathway of gut bacteria in vertebrates.

KW - INTESTINAL MICROBIOTA

KW - EGG VIABILITY

KW - EARLY-LIFE

KW - INCUBATION

KW - EVOLUTION

KW - CONTAMINATION

KW - COLONIZATION

KW - MECHANISMS

KW - DIVERSITY

KW - INFECTION

U2 - 10.3390/microorganisms8010061

DO - 10.3390/microorganisms8010061

M3 - Article

C2 - 31905837

VL - 8

JO - Microorganisms

JF - Microorganisms

SN - 2076-2607

IS - 1

M1 - 61

ER -

ID: 111902919