Publication

Predicted efficacy of a pharmacogenetic passport for inflammatory bowel disease

Bangma, A., Voskuil, M. D., Uniken Venema, W. T. C., Brugge, H., Hu, S., Lanting, P., Franke, L., Dijkstra, G., Festen, E. A. M. & Weersma, R. K., Jun-2020, In : Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics. 51, 11, p. 1105-1115 11 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

APA

Bangma, A., Voskuil, M. D., Uniken Venema, W. T. C., Brugge, H., Hu, S., Lanting, P., ... Weersma, R. K. (2020). Predicted efficacy of a pharmacogenetic passport for inflammatory bowel disease. Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, 51(11), 1105-1115. https://doi.org/10.1111/apt.15762

Author

Bangma, Amber ; Voskuil, Michiel D ; Uniken Venema, Werna T C ; Brugge, Harm ; Hu, Shixian ; Lanting, Pauline ; Franke, Lude ; Dijkstra, Gerard ; Festen, Eleonora A M ; Weersma, Rinse K. / Predicted efficacy of a pharmacogenetic passport for inflammatory bowel disease. In: Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics. 2020 ; Vol. 51, No. 11. pp. 1105-1115.

Harvard

Bangma, A, Voskuil, MD, Uniken Venema, WTC, Brugge, H, Hu, S, Lanting, P, Franke, L, Dijkstra, G, Festen, EAM & Weersma, RK 2020, 'Predicted efficacy of a pharmacogenetic passport for inflammatory bowel disease', Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, vol. 51, no. 11, pp. 1105-1115. https://doi.org/10.1111/apt.15762

Standard

Predicted efficacy of a pharmacogenetic passport for inflammatory bowel disease. / Bangma, Amber; Voskuil, Michiel D; Uniken Venema, Werna T C; Brugge, Harm; Hu, Shixian; Lanting, Pauline; Franke, Lude; Dijkstra, Gerard; Festen, Eleonora A M; Weersma, Rinse K.

In: Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, Vol. 51, No. 11, 06.2020, p. 1105-1115.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Vancouver

Bangma A, Voskuil MD, Uniken Venema WTC, Brugge H, Hu S, Lanting P et al. Predicted efficacy of a pharmacogenetic passport for inflammatory bowel disease. Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics. 2020 Jun;51(11):1105-1115. https://doi.org/10.1111/apt.15762


BibTeX

@article{c8f0c420782d435d895f3decda858b3c,
title = "Predicted efficacy of a pharmacogenetic passport for inflammatory bowel disease",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: High inter-individual variability in therapeutic response to drugs used in the management of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) leads to high morbidity and high costs. Genetic variants predictive of thiopurine-induced myelosuppression, thiopurine-induced pancreatitis and immunogenicity of Tumour Necrosis Factor alpha (TNFα) antagonists have been identified, but uptake of pre-treatment pharmacogenetic testing into clinical guidelines has been slow.AIM: To explore the efficacy of a pharmacogenetic passport for IBD that includes multiple pharmacogenetic predictors of response.METHODS: Patients with IBD exposed to thiopurines and/or TNFα antagonists were retrospectively evaluated for the presence of thiopurine toxicity and/or immunogenicity of TNFα antagonists. All patients were genotyped using both whole-exome sequencing and the Illumina Global Screening Array. An in-house-developed computational pipeline translated genetic data into an IBD pharmacogenetic passport that predicted risks for thiopurine toxicity and immunogenicity of TNFα antagonists per patient. Using pharmacogenetic-guided treatment guidelines, we calculated clinical efficacy estimates for pharmacogenetic testing for IBD.RESULTS: Among 710 patients with IBD exposed to thiopurines and/or TNFα antagonists, 150 adverse drug responses occurred and our pharmacogenetic passport would have predicted 54 (36{\%}) of these. Using a pharmacogenetic passport for IBD that includes genetic variants predictive of thiopurine-induced myelosuppression, thiopurine-induced pancreatitis, and immunogenicity of TNFα antagonists, 24 patients need to be genotyped to prevent one of these adverse drug responses.CONCLUSIONS: This study highlights the clinical efficacy of a pharmacogenetic passport for IBD. Implementation of such a pharmacogenetic passport into clinical management of IBD may contribute to a reduction in adverse drug responses.",
author = "Amber Bangma and Voskuil, {Michiel D} and {Uniken Venema}, {Werna T C} and Harm Brugge and Shixian Hu and Pauline Lanting and Lude Franke and Gerard Dijkstra and Festen, {Eleonora A M} and Weersma, {Rinse K}",
note = "{\circledC} 2020 The Authors. Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.",
year = "2020",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1111/apt.15762",
language = "English",
volume = "51",
pages = "1105--1115",
journal = "Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics",
issn = "0269-2813",
publisher = "Wiley",
number = "11",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Predicted efficacy of a pharmacogenetic passport for inflammatory bowel disease

AU - Bangma, Amber

AU - Voskuil, Michiel D

AU - Uniken Venema, Werna T C

AU - Brugge, Harm

AU - Hu, Shixian

AU - Lanting, Pauline

AU - Franke, Lude

AU - Dijkstra, Gerard

AU - Festen, Eleonora A M

AU - Weersma, Rinse K

N1 - © 2020 The Authors. Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

PY - 2020/6

Y1 - 2020/6

N2 - BACKGROUND: High inter-individual variability in therapeutic response to drugs used in the management of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) leads to high morbidity and high costs. Genetic variants predictive of thiopurine-induced myelosuppression, thiopurine-induced pancreatitis and immunogenicity of Tumour Necrosis Factor alpha (TNFα) antagonists have been identified, but uptake of pre-treatment pharmacogenetic testing into clinical guidelines has been slow.AIM: To explore the efficacy of a pharmacogenetic passport for IBD that includes multiple pharmacogenetic predictors of response.METHODS: Patients with IBD exposed to thiopurines and/or TNFα antagonists were retrospectively evaluated for the presence of thiopurine toxicity and/or immunogenicity of TNFα antagonists. All patients were genotyped using both whole-exome sequencing and the Illumina Global Screening Array. An in-house-developed computational pipeline translated genetic data into an IBD pharmacogenetic passport that predicted risks for thiopurine toxicity and immunogenicity of TNFα antagonists per patient. Using pharmacogenetic-guided treatment guidelines, we calculated clinical efficacy estimates for pharmacogenetic testing for IBD.RESULTS: Among 710 patients with IBD exposed to thiopurines and/or TNFα antagonists, 150 adverse drug responses occurred and our pharmacogenetic passport would have predicted 54 (36%) of these. Using a pharmacogenetic passport for IBD that includes genetic variants predictive of thiopurine-induced myelosuppression, thiopurine-induced pancreatitis, and immunogenicity of TNFα antagonists, 24 patients need to be genotyped to prevent one of these adverse drug responses.CONCLUSIONS: This study highlights the clinical efficacy of a pharmacogenetic passport for IBD. Implementation of such a pharmacogenetic passport into clinical management of IBD may contribute to a reduction in adverse drug responses.

AB - BACKGROUND: High inter-individual variability in therapeutic response to drugs used in the management of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) leads to high morbidity and high costs. Genetic variants predictive of thiopurine-induced myelosuppression, thiopurine-induced pancreatitis and immunogenicity of Tumour Necrosis Factor alpha (TNFα) antagonists have been identified, but uptake of pre-treatment pharmacogenetic testing into clinical guidelines has been slow.AIM: To explore the efficacy of a pharmacogenetic passport for IBD that includes multiple pharmacogenetic predictors of response.METHODS: Patients with IBD exposed to thiopurines and/or TNFα antagonists were retrospectively evaluated for the presence of thiopurine toxicity and/or immunogenicity of TNFα antagonists. All patients were genotyped using both whole-exome sequencing and the Illumina Global Screening Array. An in-house-developed computational pipeline translated genetic data into an IBD pharmacogenetic passport that predicted risks for thiopurine toxicity and immunogenicity of TNFα antagonists per patient. Using pharmacogenetic-guided treatment guidelines, we calculated clinical efficacy estimates for pharmacogenetic testing for IBD.RESULTS: Among 710 patients with IBD exposed to thiopurines and/or TNFα antagonists, 150 adverse drug responses occurred and our pharmacogenetic passport would have predicted 54 (36%) of these. Using a pharmacogenetic passport for IBD that includes genetic variants predictive of thiopurine-induced myelosuppression, thiopurine-induced pancreatitis, and immunogenicity of TNFα antagonists, 24 patients need to be genotyped to prevent one of these adverse drug responses.CONCLUSIONS: This study highlights the clinical efficacy of a pharmacogenetic passport for IBD. Implementation of such a pharmacogenetic passport into clinical management of IBD may contribute to a reduction in adverse drug responses.

U2 - 10.1111/apt.15762

DO - 10.1111/apt.15762

M3 - Article

C2 - 32363635

VL - 51

SP - 1105

EP - 1115

JO - Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics

JF - Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics

SN - 0269-2813

IS - 11

ER -

ID: 128350237