Publication

Post-transplant obesity impacts long-term survival after liver transplantation

van Son, J., Stam, S. P., Gomes-Neto, A. W., Osté, M. C. J., Blokzijl, H., van den Berg, A. P., Porte, R. J., Bakker, S. J. L. & de Meijer, V. E., May-2020, In : Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental. 106, 9 p., 154204.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

APA

van Son, J., Stam, S. P., Gomes-Neto, A. W., Osté, M. C. J., Blokzijl, H., van den Berg, A. P., Porte, R. J., Bakker, S. J. L., & de Meijer, V. E. (2020). Post-transplant obesity impacts long-term survival after liver transplantation. Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, 106, [154204]. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.metabol.2020.154204

Author

van Son, Jeffrey ; Stam, Suzanne P ; Gomes-Neto, Antonio W ; Osté, Maryse C J ; Blokzijl, Hans ; van den Berg, Aad P ; Porte, Robert J ; Bakker, Stephan J L ; de Meijer, Vincent E. / Post-transplant obesity impacts long-term survival after liver transplantation. In: Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental. 2020 ; Vol. 106.

Harvard

van Son, J, Stam, SP, Gomes-Neto, AW, Osté, MCJ, Blokzijl, H, van den Berg, AP, Porte, RJ, Bakker, SJL & de Meijer, VE 2020, 'Post-transplant obesity impacts long-term survival after liver transplantation', Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, vol. 106, 154204. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.metabol.2020.154204

Standard

Post-transplant obesity impacts long-term survival after liver transplantation. / van Son, Jeffrey; Stam, Suzanne P; Gomes-Neto, Antonio W; Osté, Maryse C J; Blokzijl, Hans; van den Berg, Aad P; Porte, Robert J; Bakker, Stephan J L; de Meijer, Vincent E.

In: Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, Vol. 106, 154204, 05.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Vancouver

van Son J, Stam SP, Gomes-Neto AW, Osté MCJ, Blokzijl H, van den Berg AP et al. Post-transplant obesity impacts long-term survival after liver transplantation. Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental. 2020 May;106. 154204. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.metabol.2020.154204


BibTeX

@article{12e3c4d84ddd4d108f3277abf3c1674e,
title = "Post-transplant obesity impacts long-term survival after liver transplantation",
abstract = "Background: Short-term survival after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) has improved over the past decades, but long-term survival remains impaired. The effects of obesity on long-term survival after OLT are controversial. Because pre-transplant body mass index (BMI) can be confounded by ascites, we hypothesized that post-transplant BMI at 1 year could predict long-term survival. Methods: A post-hoc analysis was performed of an observational cohort study consisting of adult recipients of a first OLT between 1993 and 2010. Baseline BMI was measured at 1-year post-transplantation to represent a stable condition. Recipients were stratified into normal weight (BMI < 25 kg/m2), overweight (25 ≤ BMI ≤ 30 kg/m2), and obese (BMI > 30 kg/m2). Kaplan-Meier survival analyses were performed with log-rank testing, followed by multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Results: Out of 370 included recipients, 184 had normal weight, 136 were overweight, and 50 were obese at 1-year post-transplantation. After median follow-up for 12.3 years, 107 recipients had died, of whom 46 (25%) had normal weight, 39 (29%) were overweight, and 22 (44%) were obese (log-rank P = 0.020). Obese recipients had a significantly increased mortality risk compared to normal weight recipients (HR 2.00, 95% CI 1.08–3.68, P = 0.027). BMI was inversely associated with 15 years patient survival (HR 1.08, 95% CI 1.03–1.14, P = 0.001 per kg/m2), independent of age, gender, muscle mass, transplant characteristics, cardiovascular risk factors, kidney- and liver function. Conclusion: Obesity at 1-year post-transplantation conveys a 2-fold increased mortality risk, which may offer potential for interventional strategies (i.e. dietary advice, lifestyle modification, or bariatric surgery) to improve long-term survival after OLT.",
keywords = "Liver transplantation, Body mass index, Long-term, Survival, Obesity, SINGLE-CENTER EXPERIENCE, BODY-MASS INDEX, MYCOPHENOLATE-MOFETIL, METABOLIC SYNDROME, DIABETES-MELLITUS, RENAL DYSFUNCTION, PATIENT SURVIVAL, RISK-FACTORS, WEIGHT-GAIN, RECIPIENTS",
author = "{van Son}, Jeffrey and Stam, {Suzanne P} and Gomes-Neto, {Antonio W} and Ost{\'e}, {Maryse C J} and Hans Blokzijl and {van den Berg}, {Aad P} and Porte, {Robert J} and Bakker, {Stephan J L} and {de Meijer}, {Vincent E}",
note = "Copyright {\textcopyright} 2020. Published by Elsevier Inc.",
year = "2020",
month = may,
doi = "10.1016/j.metabol.2020.154204",
language = "English",
volume = "106",
journal = "Metabolism",
issn = "0026-0495",
publisher = "W B SAUNDERS CO-ELSEVIER INC",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Post-transplant obesity impacts long-term survival after liver transplantation

AU - van Son, Jeffrey

AU - Stam, Suzanne P

AU - Gomes-Neto, Antonio W

AU - Osté, Maryse C J

AU - Blokzijl, Hans

AU - van den Berg, Aad P

AU - Porte, Robert J

AU - Bakker, Stephan J L

AU - de Meijer, Vincent E

N1 - Copyright © 2020. Published by Elsevier Inc.

PY - 2020/5

Y1 - 2020/5

N2 - Background: Short-term survival after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) has improved over the past decades, but long-term survival remains impaired. The effects of obesity on long-term survival after OLT are controversial. Because pre-transplant body mass index (BMI) can be confounded by ascites, we hypothesized that post-transplant BMI at 1 year could predict long-term survival. Methods: A post-hoc analysis was performed of an observational cohort study consisting of adult recipients of a first OLT between 1993 and 2010. Baseline BMI was measured at 1-year post-transplantation to represent a stable condition. Recipients were stratified into normal weight (BMI < 25 kg/m2), overweight (25 ≤ BMI ≤ 30 kg/m2), and obese (BMI > 30 kg/m2). Kaplan-Meier survival analyses were performed with log-rank testing, followed by multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Results: Out of 370 included recipients, 184 had normal weight, 136 were overweight, and 50 were obese at 1-year post-transplantation. After median follow-up for 12.3 years, 107 recipients had died, of whom 46 (25%) had normal weight, 39 (29%) were overweight, and 22 (44%) were obese (log-rank P = 0.020). Obese recipients had a significantly increased mortality risk compared to normal weight recipients (HR 2.00, 95% CI 1.08–3.68, P = 0.027). BMI was inversely associated with 15 years patient survival (HR 1.08, 95% CI 1.03–1.14, P = 0.001 per kg/m2), independent of age, gender, muscle mass, transplant characteristics, cardiovascular risk factors, kidney- and liver function. Conclusion: Obesity at 1-year post-transplantation conveys a 2-fold increased mortality risk, which may offer potential for interventional strategies (i.e. dietary advice, lifestyle modification, or bariatric surgery) to improve long-term survival after OLT.

AB - Background: Short-term survival after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) has improved over the past decades, but long-term survival remains impaired. The effects of obesity on long-term survival after OLT are controversial. Because pre-transplant body mass index (BMI) can be confounded by ascites, we hypothesized that post-transplant BMI at 1 year could predict long-term survival. Methods: A post-hoc analysis was performed of an observational cohort study consisting of adult recipients of a first OLT between 1993 and 2010. Baseline BMI was measured at 1-year post-transplantation to represent a stable condition. Recipients were stratified into normal weight (BMI < 25 kg/m2), overweight (25 ≤ BMI ≤ 30 kg/m2), and obese (BMI > 30 kg/m2). Kaplan-Meier survival analyses were performed with log-rank testing, followed by multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Results: Out of 370 included recipients, 184 had normal weight, 136 were overweight, and 50 were obese at 1-year post-transplantation. After median follow-up for 12.3 years, 107 recipients had died, of whom 46 (25%) had normal weight, 39 (29%) were overweight, and 22 (44%) were obese (log-rank P = 0.020). Obese recipients had a significantly increased mortality risk compared to normal weight recipients (HR 2.00, 95% CI 1.08–3.68, P = 0.027). BMI was inversely associated with 15 years patient survival (HR 1.08, 95% CI 1.03–1.14, P = 0.001 per kg/m2), independent of age, gender, muscle mass, transplant characteristics, cardiovascular risk factors, kidney- and liver function. Conclusion: Obesity at 1-year post-transplantation conveys a 2-fold increased mortality risk, which may offer potential for interventional strategies (i.e. dietary advice, lifestyle modification, or bariatric surgery) to improve long-term survival after OLT.

KW - Liver transplantation

KW - Body mass index

KW - Long-term

KW - Survival

KW - Obesity

KW - SINGLE-CENTER EXPERIENCE

KW - BODY-MASS INDEX

KW - MYCOPHENOLATE-MOFETIL

KW - METABOLIC SYNDROME

KW - DIABETES-MELLITUS

KW - RENAL DYSFUNCTION

KW - PATIENT SURVIVAL

KW - RISK-FACTORS

KW - WEIGHT-GAIN

KW - RECIPIENTS

U2 - 10.1016/j.metabol.2020.154204

DO - 10.1016/j.metabol.2020.154204

M3 - Article

C2 - 32173406

VL - 106

JO - Metabolism

JF - Metabolism

SN - 0026-0495

M1 - 154204

ER -

ID: 120509979